A History and Description of the Modern Dogs of Great Britain and Ireland: Sporting Division ...

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Horace Cox, 1897 - Dogs
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Page 173 - On the head, front of legs, and tips of ears should be short and fine, but on all other parts of the body and legs it ought to be of moderate length, flat, and as free as possible from curl or wave. FEATHERING. — The feather on the upper portion of the ears should be long and silky ; on the back of fore and hind legs long and fine ; a fair amount of hair on the belly, forming a nice fringe, which may extend on chest and throat. Feet to be well feathered between the toes. Tail to have a nice fringe...
Page 173 - Should be long, shoulders fine at the the points, deep, and sloping well back. The chest as deep as possible, rather narrow in front. The ribs well sprung, leaving plenty of lung room. Loins muscular and slightly arched. The hindquarters wide and powerful. LEGS AND FEET. — The hind legs from hip to hock should be long and muscular ; from hock to heel short and strong. The stifle and hock joints well bent, and not inclined either in or out. The fore legs should be straight and sinewy, having plenty...
Page 319 - Shoulders and Chest.- — The former sloping and fine, chest deep and well developed, but not too wide and round to interfere with the free action of the forelegs.
Page 196 - There should be a moderate stop — the brow slightly pronounced so that the skull is not absolutely in a straight line with the nose. The brow ridges aid in defining the stop. The head should be cleancut and free from fleshy cheeks; the bony structure of the skull chiseled beneath the eye with no prominence in the cheek. The skull may show some median line; the occipital bone is not conspicuous in mature dogs.
Page 291 - The arms and thighs must be bony, as well as muscular, knees and hocks large and strong, pasterns very short and bony, feet large and round, and with short hair between the toes. The legs should be very short and strong, with great bone, and may...
Page 117 - ... or in-turned leg is less objectionable than the out-turn, in which the elbow is confined by its close attachment to the ribs. The arm should be muscular and the bone fully developed, with strong and broad knees, short pasterns, of which the size in point of bone should be as great as possible (a very important point), and their slope not exceeding a very slight deviation from the straight line. Many good judges insist upon a perfectly upright pastern, like that of the foxhound ; but it must not...
Page 302 - Very powerful and muscular, wide and fully developed. STERN. — Well set on and carried low, if possible below the level of the back, in a perfectly straight line, or with a slight downward inclination; never elevated above the back, and in action always kept low; nicely fringed, with wavy feather of silky texture. FEET AND LEGS. — Feet not too small and well protected between the toes with soft feather; good strong pads. Legs straight and immensely boned, strong and short, and nicely feathered,...
Page 290 - The skull should be moderately long, and also wide, with an indentation in the middle, and a full stop, brows fairly heavy; occiput full, but not pointed, the whole giving an appearance of heaviness without dulness.
Page 174 - ... and throat. Feet to be well feathered between the toes. Tail to have a nice fringe of moderately long hair, decreasing in length as it approaches the point. All feathering to be as straight and flat as possible. COLOUR AND MARKINGS. — The colour should be a rich golden chestnut, with no trace whatever of black...
Page 320 - That most characteristic of blue blood in all the spaniel family, may, in the lighter and more active Cocker, although set low down, be allowed a slightly higher carriage than in the other breeds, but never cocked up over, but rather in a line with the back, though the lower its carriage and action the better, and when at work its action should be incessant in this, the brightest and merriest of the whole spaniel family.

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