History of Armenia, by Father Michael Chamich: From B. C. 2247 to the Year of Christ 1780, Or 1229 of the Armenian Era, Tr. from the Original Armenian, by Johannes Avdall, Volume 2

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Printed at Bishop's college Press, by H. Townsend, 1827 - Armenia
 

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Page 554 - She weepeth sore in the night, and her tears are on her cheeks: Among all her lovers she hath none to comfort her: All her friends have dealt treacherously with her, they are become her enemies.
Page 554 - How doth the city sit solitary, that was full of people ! how is she become as a widow ! she that was great among the nations, and princess among the provinces, how is she become tributary...
Page 154 - When young he married, and became much honoured by the emperor, who conferred upon him the title of Duke, and on the death of his father he succeeded him in his government of Mesopotamia. Some time after this appointment, he became disgusted with the world; and relinquishing his government, and separating himself from his wife, he embraced a monastic life. His original. name was Vahram, but on his being elected pontiff he assumed the name of Gregory, to indicate that the chair of his ancestor St....
Page 151 - human blood flowed in torrents, and so great was the carnage, that the streets were literally choked up with dead bodies; and the waters of the river were reddened from the quantity of bloody corpses.
Page 244 - They all thereupon received the same doctrine, declaring in a reply to the pontiff and meeting that it was perfectly consistent with the holy writings and the sentiments of the fathers of the church. The monk Vanakan Johannes also replied, and demonstrated in the clearest manner from the nature of Christianity, that the point in question was an incontrovertible fact. The pontiff Constantine then wrote to the pope to intimate the acceptance by the Armenians of the doctrine of the emanation of the...
Page 529 - Armenian youths as well as other students from foreign nations, all of whom learn there the Armenian, Russian, Latin, French and German languages. The course of education ends in six or seven years, more or less, according to the capacity of the students. Thirty Armenian youths are gratuitously supported. Besides grammar and rhetoric, they are instructed in geography, history, mathematics, logic, drawing, and other liberal arts and sciences. Some of them, who may be inclined to enter into clerical...
Page 88 - He derives his greatest fame, however, from his private virtues. Having built a number of hospitals, infirmaries, and almshouses, he made it a point to visit them frequently ; here he indulged in the greatest familiarity with the poorest ; and even, it is said, often invited the sick, leprous, and maimed, to sit and eat with him at his own table. So unbounded was he in his donations to the poor, that on his death not a single piece of money was found in his treasury. Hence he was surnamed the Charitable.
Page 1 - Bagratians were descended from Abraham, by the line of Isaac. The first of this family, who came to Armenia, was Shumbat, during the captivity of his race by Nebuchadnezzar. One of his posterity was the celebrated Bagarat, who lived in the reign of Valarsaces ; and in consequence of his exalted virtue and eminent services was ennobled by that prince by the title of Bagarat the Bagratian.
Page 160 - ... Tarsus, and when the Greeks became less ardent in their search for him, proceeded to annoy them again. Having many adherents, numberless were the evils which he brought upon the enemies of his religion. Unfortunately, however, he at length fell into the hands of the Greeks, by the following means. Having arrived with his people on the plains of Arzias, near the fort of Kizistra, he imprudently, accompanied by only three individuals, one of whom was Reuben his relation, went to take repose in...
Page 92 - HE 428, this monarch set about fortifying the city of Ani. He first surrounded it with a wall of exceeding great height and thickness, on which he raised lofty towers for the station of its defenders in case of exigency. He then caused a trench of amazing depth and breadth to be dug outside, so as to encompass all the city and works, the whole being faced with stone and bricks. This was a work of such magnitude that it took him eight years to finish it. In the city of Ani he built such a number...

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