The Age of Innocence

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Broadview Press, Mar 21, 2002 - Fiction - 432 pages

The Age of Innocence marks the pinnacle of Edith Wharton’s career as one of the finest American novelists of her era. The narrative follows Newland Archer, of upper-crust 1870s New York, whose passion for the mysterious Countess Ellen Olenska leads him to question the very foundations of his way of life. Written in the aftermath of World War I, the novel explores the psychological and cultural paradoxes of desire in a world undergoing unprecedented transformations.

This edition includes a critical introduction and a range of appendices that contextualize the novel in terms of its modernist themes and tensions.

 

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Contents

Acknowledgements
7
Introduction
11
A Brief Chronology
47
A Note on the Text
51
The Age of Innocence
53
Whartons Outlines
343
Whartons Correspondence About The Age of Innocence
347
Contemporary Reviews
354
From A Little Girls New York
368
Wharton and Others on the Status of Women
374
Ethnographic DiscourseVictorian to Modern
403
Wharton on Modernity and Tradition
421
Select Bibliography
430
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

Michael Nowlin is Assistant Professor of English at The University of Victoria. He has published articles on Edith Wharton, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Toni Morrison.

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