Applied History, Volume 1, Issue 6

Front Cover
Benjamin Franklin Shambaugh
State Historical Society of Iowa., 1912 - Iowa
 

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Page 78 - ... is to hear the parties, may hear evidence in regard to pertinent matters, and may revise the decision of the committee in whole or in part, or refer the matter back to the committee for further findings of fact. And any party in interest may present the order or decision of the commissioner, or the decision of an arbitration committee from which no claim for review has been filed, to the district court of the county in which the injury occurred, whereupon the court shall render a decree in accordance...
Page 13 - ... engaged, nor to the appliances within his vision. A multitude of separate operations are combined into one comprehensive mechanical process, the successful consummation of which requires the cooperation of thousands of operatives and of countless pieces of apparatus in such close interdependence that a hidden defect of even a minor part, or a momentary lapse of memory or of attention by a single individual may imperil the lives of hundreds. A tower man misinterprets an order, or a brittle rail...
Page 26 - Since disabling injuries by accident and disease are inevitable concomitants of that mechanical industry which has made modern civilization possible, and the products of which are enjoyed in fullest measure by the classes least exposed to its hazards; since the victims of these injuries are precisely those least able to bear the burden of economic loss themselves or to shift it to others...
Page 24 - ... systematic accident relief, is poverty and the long train of evils that flow from poverty. When a skilled craftsman is killed or injured in the course of duty, the children are taken out of school, the family removes to less comfortable quarters in a more undesirable neighborhood, the mother takes in boarders or goes out to work, the boys sink to the rank of the unskilled and the girls marry beneath the economic class in which they were born. When a similar calamity befalls a common laborer,...
Page 78 - III, section seven, the board shall hear the parties and may hear evidence in regard to any or all matters pertinent thereto and may revise the decision of the committee in whole or in part, or may refer the matter back to the committee for further findings of fact, and shall file its decision with the records of the proceedings and notify the parties thereof. No party shall as a matter of right be entitled to a second hearing upon any question of fact.
Page 13 - His movements fall into a natural rhythm, indeed, but the beat is both less rapid and more irregular than the rhythm of most machines — with the consequence that he fails to remove his hand before the die descends or allows himself to be struck by the recoiling lever. It requires an appreciable time for the red light or the warning gong to penetrate his consciousness, and his response is apt to be tardy or in the wrong direction. Fatigue, also, overcomes him, slowing his movements, lengthening...
Page 78 - ... therewith and notify the parties. Such decree shall have the same effect and all proceedings in relation thereto shall thereafter be the same as though rendered in a suit duly heard and determined by said court, except that there shall be no appeal therefrom upon questions of fact, or where the decree is based upon a decision of an arbitration committee or a memorandum of agreement, and that there shall be no appeal from a decree based upon an order or decision of the board which has not been...
Page 58 - ... dollars per week, then he shall receive the full amount of wages per week. This compensation shall be paid during the period of such disability, not, however, beyond four hundred weeks.
Page 14 - ... of a thousand men who climb to dizzy heights in erecting steel structures a certain number will fall to death, and of a thousand girls who feed metal strips into stamping machines a certain number will have their fingers crushed. So regularly do such injuries occur that every machine-made commodity may be said to have a definite cost in human blood and tears — a life for so many tons of coal, a lacerated hand for so many laundered shirts. This "blood tax" of industry, as it may well be termed,...
Page 13 - shot" with slack, and a dust explosion wipes out a score of lives. A steel beam yields to a pressure that it was calculated to bear, and a rising skyscraper collapses in consequence, burying a small army of workmen in the ruins. In the second place, human nature, inherited from generations that knew not the machine, is imperfectly fitted for the •train put upon it by mechanical industry.

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