The Definitive Guide to Stellent Content Server Development

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Apress, Nov 30, 2006 - Computers - 479 pages
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Every business relies on a database of one sort or another to manage important structured information. Everybody needs to keep track of employee records, customer information, and inventory lists—and databases are essential for this. They are an ideal place to put records so they can be secured, searched, updated, and maintained. As database applications became more commonplace, users realized that they wanted similar functionality for all their content. They want simple applications to help them manage and distribute information in all formats, not just rigidly structured database records. Ideally, they can find the information they need without even knowing it exists. Naturally, this pr- ents a huge challenge. Business content is highly unstructured. It includes everything from email messages to policy documents, to scanned contracts, to website graphics. Plus, these items have complex and dynamic relationships with each other that do not cleanly translate into database records. Solving this problem is the realm of Content Management systems, which have been around for years, but have not yet reached their fullest potential. The Stellent Content Server is the most award-winning Content Management system available. It is considered by many analysts to have the most complete solution to the general problems of Content Management. It is a coherent framework for general Content Management applications, as opposed to the patchwork of single-purpose applications that are offered by most vendors.
 

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Still very relevant to UCM development even in 11g

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Copyright

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Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 464 - HDA files are used throughout the Content Server for table-based configuration data. A developer uses them for the Component Definition File, which contains references for all resources in a custom component. Another commonly used HDA file is the Workflow Companion File, which contains state and history information about an item currently in workflow. The HDA format is the default serialization of the primary data structure in the Content Server.
Page 21 - I). 5. The server loads the definition for the service, including security information, a template page, and a list of actions to perform for this service. 6. The server validates that this user can run the service. 7. The server executes the service actions, which can be SQL queries or Java code.
Page 21 - DataBinder and pushes the results back into it. 9. After all actions are complete, and no error occurred, the server loads the response template. 10. The server renders the template into HTML with the data in the DataBinder. 11. The server sends the response HTML to the web server. 12. The web server sends the HTML to the user.
Page 21 - Briefly, the steps are as follows: 1 . The user makes a web request. 2. The web server authenticates the user. 3. If the request is a service call, the web server forwards it to the Content Server. 4. The Content Server parses the data in the request (this data includes user information, the service to run, and all service parameters).
Page 461 - HDA format is to quickly serialize tabular data while still retaining the flexibility of name-value pairs. It is similar in flexibility to XML. Unlike XML, however, the HDA format is more compact and focused on table-based data, so it is more quickly parsed by a computer.
Page 464 - All parameters in the request are stored in the LocalData for the DataBinder. The response data is attached as ResultSets, OptionLists, and new LocalData. This DataBinder is then used to render the response.
Page 4 - the technologies used to Capture, Manage, Store, Preserve, and Deliver content and documents related to organizational processes.
Page 18 - Server is at its core an extensible Java framework. It uses data-driven resources to define services, which include the content management features in the server: check-in, checkout, workflow processing, subscriptions, conversion, and search.
Page 20 - Server has an internal architecture similar to a middleware application. It stores data about content items on a file system and in a database. It stores user information in a database or an external repository such as a Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) repository.
Page 17 - In general, it is a network application that connects your users with the information they need, when they need it, and in the delivery format they desire.

About the author (2006)

Brian "Bex" Huff has worked at Stellent for seven years, and is a generally acknowledged guru on the Content Server. He's worn many hats in the company, including that of architect, designer, and developer, and he has performed training, documentation, and consulting. Brian is a moderator and frequent contributor to the intradoc_users Yahoo group for Stellent users.

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