One Night's Mystery: A Novel

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G.W. Carleton, 1876 - American fiction - 443 pages
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Contents

I
11
II
20
III
27
IV
33
VI
41
VII
53
VIII
62
IX
68
XXXII
247
XXXIII
254
XXXIV
262
XXXV
272
XXXVI
284
XXXVIII
292
XL
301
XLI
311

X
74
XI
86
XII
91
XIII
102
XIV
113
XV
122
XVI
131
XVII
145
XIX
160
XXI
167
XXII
177
XXIV
185
XXV
194
XXVI
205
XXVIII
216
XXX
226
XXXI
236
XLII
321
XLIV
328
XLV
335
XLVII
345
XLIX
348
L
359
LI
367
LII
377
LIII
382
LIV
388
LVI
394
LVIII
400
LIX
410
LX
416
LXII
423
LXIII
430
LXIV
438

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Page 137 - Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, Men were deceivers ever, One foot in sea and one on shore, To one thing constant never : Then sigh not so, but let them go, And be you blithe and bonny, Converting all your sounds of woe Into Hey nonny, nonny.
Page 424 - Mid pleasures and palaces though we may roam, Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home...
Page 192 - In the midst of life we are in death ; of whom may we seek for succour, but of thee, O Lord, who for our sins art justly displeased...
Page 331 - A weary lot is thine, fair maid, A weary lot is thine ! To pull the thorn thy brow to braid, And press the rue for wine ! A lightsome eye, a soldier's mien, A feather of the blue, A doublet of the Lincoln green, — No more of me you knew, My love ! No more of me you knew. " This morn is merry June, I trow, The rose is budding fain ;* But she shall bloom in winter snow, Ere we two meet again.
Page 15 - At once there rose so wild a yell Within that dark and narrow dell, As all the fiends, from heaven that fell, Had pealed the banner-cry of hell...
Page 335 - Let the sweet heavens endure, Not close and darken above me Before I am quite quite sure That there is one to love me ; Then let come what come may To a life that has been so sad, I shall have had my day.
Page 106 - It is good to be merry and wise, It is good to be honest and true ; It is good to be off with the old love Before you are on with the new.
Page 179 - What is this passing scene ? A peevish April day ! A little sun — a little rain, And then night sweeps along the plain, And all things fade away.
Page 366 - Then awake! — the heavens look bright, my dear, 'Tis never too late for delight, my dear; And the best of all ways To lengthen our days Is to steal a few hours from the night, my dear!
Page 258 - Oh, lift thy drooping head, Thou who in gloom and dread Hast lain so long. Death comes to set thee free; Oh, meet him cheerily As thy true friend, And all thy fears shall cease, And in eternal peace Thy penance end.

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