The Three Musketeers

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Dramatists Play Service, Inc., 1976 - Drama - 92 pages
77 Reviews
THE STORY: Everyone is familiar with the renowned adventures of D'Artagnan and his three fellow musketeers, Athos, Porthos and Aramis, as they fight for king and country--with frequent detours involving wine, women and song. The entire panoply of ac
 

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User Review  - TheIdleWoman - LibraryThing

The classic swashbuckler; I would have to give this edition a mere four stars, however, because there were elements of the translation that I found rather clumsy and which jarred. Only elements, though; most of the book is an unmitigated delight. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MrsLee - LibraryThing

Ah, so many reviews, this will be a record for me of some of my thoughts while reading this classic. I was impressed by the amount of political commentary Dumas was able to work into the story by ... Read full review

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Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
9
Section 3
11
Section 4
86
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About the author (1976)

After an idle youth, Alexandre Dumas went to Paris and spent some years writing. A volume of short stories and some farces were his only productions until 1927, when his play Henri III (1829) became a success and made him famous. It was as a storyteller rather than a playwright, however, that Dumas gained enduring success. Perhaps the most broadly popular of French romantic novelists, Dumas published some 1,200 volumes during his lifetime. These were not all written by him, however, but were the works of a body of collaborators known as "Dumas & Co." Some of his best works were plagiarized. For example, The Three Musketeers (1844) was taken from the Memoirs of Artagnan by an eighteenth-century writer, and The Count of Monte Cristo (1845) from Penchet's A Diamond and a Vengeance. At the end of his life, drained of money and sapped by his work, Dumas left Paris and went to live at his son's villa, where he remained until his death.

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