Suggestions to Military Riflemen

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F. Hudson Publishing Company, 1909 - Rifle practice - 243 pages
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Contents

I
7
II
13
III
22
IV
35
V
57
VI
65
VII
71
VIII
80
XII
128
XIII
144
XIV
149
XV
154
XVI
175
XVII
183
XVIII
194
XIX
202

IX
98
X
105
XI
112

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Page 245 - States, particularly among civilians, both as a sport and for the purposes of qualifying as finished marksmen those individuals who may be called upon to serve in time of war; to encourage competition in marksmanship between teams and individuals in all parts of the United States; to encourage legislation for the establishment and maintenance of suitable ranges; to secure the issuance of arms and ammunition to those practicing on such ranges; and to create a public sentiment for the encouragement...
Page 95 - B," in Japan (a black paste obtainable from dealers in painter's supplies in 1pound cans), 5 ounces. Gasoline, 76 test, 12 ounces. Add the gasoline little by little to the paste, mixing thoroughly after each addition. If it is found to dry with any gloss whatever, there is too much "binder" in the paste. To correct this add to the paste a little powdered lampblack and work up thoroughly with the first portion of the gasoline which is added. ({) Less elevation will generally be required on hot days;...
Page 52 - ... who is to fire the piece, the loop being drawn through the upper swivel until the claw comes well up toward the upper swivel. The claw end of the short strap is then passed through the lower swivel from muzzle to butt and brought up and engaged in the proper holes in the long strap, drawing the sling taut. This gives the parade position of the sling. To adjust it for firing or carrying, the claw of the short strap is disengaged and reengaged in the proper holes of the short strap, no change being...
Page 150 - ... ready." At a signal given at the firing point (trumpet or telephone) the target appears, remains in sight twenty seconds, then disappears. The soldier attempts to fire five shots, emptying the magazine and firing at will, without command, from the instant any portion of the target appears until it has completely disappeared. Each unfired cartridge counts as a miss. In case of a defective cartridge or disabled piece the practice is repeated.
Page 245 - ... those individuals who may be called upon to serve in time of war; to encourage competition in marksmanship between teams and individuals; to encourage legislation for the establishment and maintenance of ranges; to secure the issue of military rifles and ammunition to those...
Page 15 - ... and the blade is 16 inches long. The rifle is sighted for ranges up to 2,850 yards. The maximum range, when elevated at an angle of 45 degrees, is 4,891 yards (389 yards less than 3 miles). The smooth bore of the rifle is 0.30 inch in diameter. It is then rifled 0.004 inch deep, making the diameter from the bottom of one groove to the bottom of the opposite groove 0.308 inch. The rifling makes one complete turn in each 10 inches of the barrel. The accompanying plate shows the names of the principal...
Page 73 - Never let your front sight appear to touch the bull's eye in aiming. Try to see the same amount of white target between the top of the front sight and the bottom of the bull's-eye each time. The eye must be focused on the bull's-eye or mark and not on the front or rear sight. Look at figures 1 and 2 until your eye retains the memory of them, then try to duplicate the picture every time you aim. Aim consistently, always the same. Never change your aim ; change your sight adjustment...
Page 75 - Firearms, manufactured by the J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company, of Chicopee Falls, Mass., with the use of impo.rted gun barrels.
Page 42 - ... the thumb and first and second fingers of the left hand. The plug is removed by holding it between the third and fourth fingers of the right hand.
Page 183 - Camus, it will be necessary to glance for a moment at the history of the dramatic form which it represents.

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