The Rainbow

Front Cover
Knopf, 1993 - Fiction - 460 pages
14 Reviews

Spanning the second half of the nineteenth century and the beginning of the twentieth, D. H. Lawrence's provocative novel traces the lives of three generations of one family on their Nottinghamshire farm. Rooted in an agrarian past, Tom and Lydia Brangwen and their descendants find themselves navigating a rapidly changing world—a world of unprecedented individualism, alienation, and liberation. Banned after an obscenity trial in 1915 for its frankness about sexuality, THE RAINBOW was most remarkable for the pathbreaking journeys of its female characters, particularly that of Ursula Brangwen, whose destiny Lawrence explored further in his next novel, Women in Love.

In its surface drama, in its capacious and expansive rhythms that so resemble the rhythms of nature itself, THE RAINBOW is one of the world's great examples of the multi-generational family saga. But the large claim that Lawrence's masterpiece has made on the attention of readers and critics stems less from this fact than from the deeper parallel history he provides for the Brangwens—a history of the growth of their souls, moving in a great arc from sensuality to self-awareness and freedom.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
4
3 stars
6
2 stars
2
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ursula - LibraryThing

Hm, this one is a bit of a puzzle for me. At first, I was engrossed in it, both the style of writing and the story. But after a while, probably about the halfway point, I was no longer enjoying myself ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

David Lodge's blurb for this is: "Lawrence is the most Dostoevskian of English novelists." He means that both sides of an ideological dispute get their say; here, individual vs community, religion vs ... Read full review

Contents

How Tom Branguen Married a Polish Lady
5
They Live at the Marsh
45
Childhood of Anna Lensky
75
Girlhood of Anna Branguen
90
Wedding at the Marsh
123
Anna Victrix
133
The Cathedral
182
Will The Child
184
The Marsh and the Flood
222
The Widening Circle
242
First Love
262
Shame 3 Io xIII The Mans World
328
The Widening Circle
383
The Bitterness of Ecstasy
397
The Rainbow
449
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1993)

The son of a miner, the prolific novelist, poet, and travel writer David Herbert Lawrence was born in Eastwood, Nottinghamshire, in 1885. He attended Nottingham University and found employment as a schoolteacher. His first novel, The White Peacock, was published in 1911, the same year his beloved mother died and he quit teaching after contracting pneumonia. The next year Lawrence published Sons and Lovers and ran off to Germany with Frieda Weekley, his former tutor's wife. His masterpieces The Rainbow and Women in Love were completed in quick succession, but the first was suppressed as indecent and the second was not published until 1920. Lawrence's lyrical writings challenged convention, promoting a return to an ideal of nature where sex is seen as a sacrament. In 1928 Lawrence's final novel, Lady Chatterley's Lover, was banned in England and the United States for indecency. He died of tuberculosis in 1930 in Venice.