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Books Books 1 - 10 of 22 on ... warmed, though the lowest layer is always the hottest. As the temperature increases,....
" ... warmed, though the lowest layer is always the hottest. As the temperature increases, the absorbed air which is generally found in ordinary water, is expelled and rises in small bubbles without noise. At last the water in contact with the heated metal... "
Theory of Heat - Page 24
by James Clerk Maxwell, John William Strutt Baron Rayleigh - 1904 - 348 pages
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The New Pocket Cyclopaedia: Or, Elements Or Useful Knowledge, Methodically ...

John Millard - Handbooks, vade-mecums, etc - 1813 - 671 pages
...thirty-three feet within the pipe, supplying the place of the air thus withdrawn. This is effected by the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. The water in a common or sucking pump is raised by this means, and rises to the height of 33 feet. The...
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The new pocket cyclopędia: or, Elements of useful knowledge

John Millard (assistant librarian of the Surrey inst.) - 1813
...thirty-three feet within the pipe, supplying the place of the air thus withdrawn. This is effected by the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. The water in a common or sticking pump is laised by this means, and rises to the height of 33 feet. The...
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A School Compendium of Natural and Experimental Philosophy: Embracing the ...

Richard Green Parker - Physics - 1849 - 382 pages
...through a stop-cock in the upper part of the bell. 147. Water is raised in the common pump by means of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. A vacuum being produced by raising the piston or pump-box,* the water below is forced up by the atmospheric...
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A SCHOOL COMPENDIUM OF NATURAL EXPERIMENTAL PHILOSOPHY

RICHARD GREEN PARKER, A.M. - 1850
...through a stop- cock in the upper part of the Dell. 147. Water is raised in the common pump by means of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. A vacuum being produced by raising the piston or pump-box,* the water below is forced up by the atmospheric...
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A School Compendium of Natural and Experimental Philosophy ...: With a ...

Richard Green Parker - Physics - 1852 - 404 pages
...through a stop.cock in the upper part of the bell. 147. Water is raised in the common pump by means of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. A vacuum being produced by raising the piston or pump.box,* the water below is forced up by the atmospheric...
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A School Compendium of Natural and Experimental Philosophy: Embracing the ...

Richard Green Parker - Physics - 1856 - 470 pages
...upper part of the bell. ' 558. THE COMMON WATER PUMP. — Water is raised in the common pump by means of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. A vacuum being produced by raising* the piston or Hoio is water raised in a common pump ? How high...
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Report on the examination for admission to the Royal military academy at ...

1864
...as it has fallen vertically. 8. Find the pressure on a given plane area under water, taking account of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. If a cube is held under water, explain whether the resultant pressure of the water upon it will change...
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Mathematical exercises

Samuel H. Winter - 1867
...the friction is 8 Ibs. a ton. 10. Find the pressure on a given plane area under water, taking account of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water. When a cube is held under water, state whether the resultant pressure of the water on it will change...
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Lowell Hydraulic Experiments: Being a Selection from Experiments on ...

James Bicheno Francis - Hydraulic motors - 1868 - 251 pages
...X 6.5364 = 7.G947 feet. The difference in these heads is 7.6947 — 1.1772 = 6.5175 feet. A portion of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water in the upper division E of the cistern, figures 1 and 2, plate XX., equivalent to this head of water,...
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LOWELL HYDRAULIC EXPERIMENTS

JAMES B. FRANCIS - 1868
...1.1772 X 6.5364 = 7.6947 feet The difference in these heads is 7.6947 — 1.1772 = 6.5175 feet A portion of the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the water in the upper division E of the cistern,, figures 1 and 2, plate XX.9 equivalent to this head of water,...
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