History of Montgomery County

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1859
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Page 14 - They care for little,- because they want but little, and the reason is, a little contents them.: in this they are sufficiently revenged on us; .if they are ignorant of our pleasures, they are also free from our pains. They are not disquieted with bills of lading and exchange, nor perplexed with chancery suits and excheque.r reckonings. We sweat and toil to live : their pleasure feeds them,, I mean their hunting, fishing, and fowling...
Page 14 - But in liberality they excel; nothing is too good for their friend: give them a fine gun, coat, or other thing, it may pass twenty hands before it sticks: light of heart, strong affections, but soon spent: the most merry creatures that live, feast and dance perpetually; they never have much, nor want much: wealth circulateth like the blood, all parts partake; and though none shall want what another hath, yet exact observers of property.
Page 53 - For some days past, there has been little less than a famine in camp. A part of the army has been a week without any kind of flesh, and the rest three or four days. Naked and starving as they are, we cannot enough admire the incomparable patience and fidelity of the soldiery, that they have not been ere this excited by their suffering to a general Mutiny and dispersion.
Page 59 - My enemies take an ungenerous advantage of me. They know the delicacy of my situation, and that motives of policy deprive me of the defence I might otherwise make against their insidious attacks. They know I cannot combat their insinuations, however injurious, without disclosing secrets, which it is of the utmost moment to conceal.
Page 16 - Their language is lofty, yet narrow ; but, like the Hebrew, in signification full ; like short-hand, in writing, one word serveth in the place of three, and the rest are supplied by the understanding of the hearer: imperfect in their tenses, wanting in their moods, participles, adverbs, conjunctions, interjections.
Page 56 - Earth, to establish our liberty and independence on a lasting foundation ; it becomes us to set apart a day for gratefully acknowledging the divine goodness, and celebrating the important event which we owe to His benign interposition.
Page 60 - The General's apartment is very small; he has had a log cabin built to dine in, which has made our quarters much more tolerable than they were at first.
Page 53 - If there is any one on this earth whom the Lord will listen to, it is George Washington ; and I feel a presentiment that under such a commander there can be no doubt of our eventually establishing our independence, and that God in his providence has willed it so.
Page 56 - At half past eleven a second cannon will be fired as a signal for the march, upon which the several brigades will begin their march by wheeling to the right by platoons, and proceed by the nearest way to the left of their ground by the new position ; this will be pointed out by the brigade inspectors.
Page 14 - Wealth circulateth like the blood, all parts partake; and though none shall want what another hath, yet exact observers of property. Some kings have sold, others presented me with several parcels of land...

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