Peasant Protest & Social Change in Colonial Korea

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University of Washington Press, 1996 - History - 234 pages
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The period from 1876 to 1946 in Korea marked a turbulent time when the country opened its market to foreign powers, became subject to Japanese colonialism, and was swept into agricultural commercialization, industrialization, and eventually postcolonial revolutionary movements. Gi-Wook Shin examines how peasants responded to these events, and to their own economic and political circumstances, with protests that eventually shaped the course of postwar revolution in the north and reform in the south.
 

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Contents

2 Social Change and Land Tenure
22
5 The Red Peasant Union Movement
75
6 The Red Peasant Union Movement
96
Class and Nation
114
8 Japanese Militarism
140
Appendix 1
181
Leadership Characteristics
188
Bibliography
209
Index
231
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About the author (1996)

Daniel Martin Varisco is professor of anthropology at Hofstra University. He is the editor and translator of several Arabic texts, including Medieval Agriculture and Islamic Science: The Almanac of a Yemeni Sultan.

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