Law in a Free State

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Macmillan and Company, 1895 - Liberty - 312 pages
 

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Contents

I
1
II
58
III
122
IV
132
V
159
VI
181
VII
220
VIII
264
IX
286

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Page 67 - That principle is, that the sole end for which mankind are warranted, individually or collectively, in interfering with the liberty of action of any of their number, is self -protection. That the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.
Page 8 - Refrain from these men, and let them alone: for if this counsel or this work be of men, it will come to nought: But if it be of God, ye cannot overthrow it; lest haply ye be found even to fight against God.
Page 195 - A woman when she is in travail hath sorrow, because her hour is come : but when she is delivered of the child, she remembereth no more the anguish, for the joy that a man Is born into the world.
Page 212 - John Your locks are like the snaw ; But blessings on your frosty pow, John Anderson my jo. John Anderson my jo, John, We clamb the hill thegither ; And mony a canty day, John, We've had wi...
Page 76 - Forasmuch as divers artificers, labourers, and servants, and grooms, keep greyhounds and other dogs, and on the holydays, when good Christian people be at church, hearing divine service, they go hunting in parks, warrens, and...
Page 232 - ... allowance to the frailties of human nature. For if a child be begotten while the parents are single, and they will endeavour to make an early reparation for the offence, by marrying within a few months after, our law is so indulgent as not to bastardize the child, if it be born, though not begotten, in lawful wedlock...
Page 77 - ... and in places where the prices of such victuals be less, they shall hold without being enhanced by this ordinance ; and that in the towns and markets of uplands they shall be sold at a less price, according as may...
Page 201 - I say therefore to the unmarried and widows, It is good for them if they abide even as I. 9 But if they cannot contain, let them marry : for it is better to marry than to burn.
Page 25 - ... that term. A man records in a letter to his son, or in his diary, that he did not dine with his wife on a certain day. No one into whose hands those papers fall could publish them to the world, even if possession of the documents had been obtained rightfully; and the prohibition would not be confined to the publication of a copy of the letter itself, or of the diary entry; the restraint extends also to a publication of the contents. What is the thing which is protected? Surely, not the intellectual...
Page 131 - Hence the less government we have the better, — the fewer laws, and the less confided power. The antidote to this abuse of formal Government is the influence of private character, the growth of the Individual...

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