Introduction to Criminology: Why Do They Do It?

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SAGE Publications, Aug 15, 2013 - Social Science - 568 pages
Introduction to Criminology: Why Do They Do It? presents a comprehensive and integrated approach to introductory criminology. Acclaimed authors and professors Pamela J. Schram and Stephen G. Tibbetts skillfully connect criminological theories to real-life cases to help students better understand criminology fundamentals. They thoroughly introduce theoretical perspectives that explain criminal behavior and are most respected by modern criminologists, while illustrating the theories with real-life examples such as street violence and property crimes. This text also includes many contemporary topics that are not well represented in competing texts, such as cybercrime, hate crimes, white-collar crime, homeland security, and identity theft.

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About the author (2013)

Pamela Schram has published on such topics as female offenders, especially those women involved in violent offenses as well women in prison. Her research interests also include examining treatment effects on gang and non-gang members. She is currently focusing on issues pertaining to elderly prisoners. Dr. Schram has been involved in various research projects that have primarily focused on evaluating treatment effectiveness such as juvenile diversion options and programs for at-risk youths. She has published three books, four book chapters, and over 20 scholarly papers. Dr. Schram received her Ph.D. from Michigan State University. She is currently the Associate Dean of the College of Social and Behavior Sciences at California State University, San Bernardino.

Stephen G. Tibbetts, currently a Professor at California State University, San Bernardino, has been pursuing an understanding of criminal offending for over the past two decades. He has attempted to discover the extent to which individuals’ inherent dispositions and attitudinal traits contribute to their offending decisions, especially in relation to other factors, such as demographic, developmental, and situational factors. Dr. Tibbetts’ research has included work on the differences between men and women in their decisions to commit deviant behavior, as well as their perceptions of risk and consequences of getting caught. His additional research interests include the effects of perinatal disorders as an influence in future criminality, the etiology of white-collar crime, and gang intervention. Dr. Tibbetts has published nine books and more than 50 scholarly papers examining various issues in criminology. He received the 2011 Outstanding Professor Award at CSU, San Bernardino. He previously worked extensively as an Officer of the Court in providing recommendations for dispositions of numerous juvenile court cases from 1997 to 2008.

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