Dictionary of Crime: Criminal Justice, Criminology, and Law Enforcement

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Rowman & Littlefield, Jun 1, 1992 - Social Science - 440 pages
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In order to understand the machinations and inner workings of crime and punishment in this country, it is necessary to negotiate through the wild linguistic labyrinth of its esoteric terminology and pungent slang. Here is Jay Robert Nash's comprehensive Dictionary of Crime: Criminal Justice, Criminology, & Law Enforcement--a massive reference by the dean of American true-crime writers that illuminates the jargon of criminal justice and exposes the language of the seedy underworld.
An invaluable aid for anyone who wants to understand the arcane argot of criminology, this remarkable volume contains over 16,000 entries used in law, police work, forensic science, drug and prison cultures, the media, and by criminals themselves. Current and historic words and phrases from all over the English-speaking world, most not found in any other dictionary, are given solid definitions, each supplemented with the word's etymology, usage, and an identification of who uses it.
In addition to being an unsurpassed reference and research tool, this dictionary holds fascinating delights for anyone interested in understanding the law, gaining insight into true-crime literature, or for just plain riveting reading.
 

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Contents

A
1
B
15
C
54
D
94
E
115
F
123
G
143
H
163
O
258
P
265
Q
300
R
303
S
323
T
381
U
404
V
408

I
186
J
195
K
203
L
210
M
226
N
250
W
412
X
429
Y
430
Z
433
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About the author (1992)

Jay Robert Nash is the bestselling author of Bloodletters and Badmen, Hustlers and Con Men, and the Almanac of True Crime. He received a special Edgar Allen Poe award in 1991 for his Encyclopedia of World Crime. He lives in Wilmette, Illinois.

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