The Life and Times of Thomas Cranmer

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Willis P. Hazard, 1852 - England - 277 pages
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Page 272 - I renounce and refuse, as things written with my hand contrary to the truth which I thought in my heart, and written for fear of death, and to save my life if it might be...
Page 81 - Try me, good king : but let me have a lawful trial, and let not my sworn enemies sit as my accusers and judges ; yea, let me receive an open trial, for my truth shall fear no open shame...
Page 192 - Remember not, Lord, our offences, nor the offences of our forefathers ; neither take thou vengeance of our sins : spare us, good Lord, spare thy people, whom thou hast redeemed with thy most precious blood, and be not angry with us for ever.
Page 79 - Your Grace's displeasure, and my imprisonment, are things so strange unto me, as what to write, or what to excuse, I am altogether ignorant. Whereas you send unto me (willing me to confess a truth, and so obtain your favour) by such an one, whom you know to be mine ancient professed enemy; I no sooner received this message by him than I rightly conceived your meaning; and if, as you say, confessing a truth, indeed may procure my safety, I shall with all willingness and duty perform your command.
Page 19 - I assure you that, after this matter is brought to pass, you shall find me as I am bound. In the mean time, to owe you my service, and then look what thing in this world I can imagine to do you pleasure in, you shall find me the gladdest woman in the world to do it. And next unto the King's grace, of one thing I make you full promise, to be assured to have it, and that is my hearty love unfeignedly during my life.
Page 38 - Cromwell, Cromwell, Had I but served my God with half the zeal I served my king, he would not in mine age Have left me naked to mine enemies.
Page 93 - Thou shalt not make any graven image, nor bow down to it, nor worship it." His mother enraged at him for this said,
Page 21 - ... thought not, at the marriage of you and me, to hear what new devices are now invented against me, to cause me to stand to the order of this court. And I conceive you do me much wrong, nay you condemn me for not answering, having no council but such as you have assigned me : you must consider that they cannot be indifferent on my part, being your own subjects. and such as you have made choice of out of your own council, whereunto they are privy, and dare not disclose your pleasure.
Page 82 - My last and only request shall be, that myself may only bear the burden of your grace's displeasure, and that it may not touch the innocent souls of those poor gentlemen who, as I understand, are likewise in strait imprisonment for my sake. If ever I have found favour in your sight, if ever the name of...
Page 176 - Saxon ancestors, to put the new sovereign in mind that he held this crown by the free choice of the nation. Hitherto, it had been the custom for the Archbishop, first to receive the King's oath to preserve the liberties of the realm, and then to ask the people if they were willing to accept him, and obey him as their liege Lord. Now, the order was inverted ; and not only did the address to the people precede the oath of the King, but in that very address they were reminded, that he held his crown...

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