The East Indian calculator, or, Tables for assisting computation of batta, interest, commission, rent, wages, &c. in Indian money: with copious tables of the exchanges between London, Calcutta, Madras, and Bombay, and of the relative value of coins current in Hindostan : tables of the weights of India and China, with their respective proportions, &c. : to which is subjoined an account of the monies, weights, and measures of India, China, Persia, Arabia, &c

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Kingsbury, Parbury, & Allen, 1823 - Money - 504 pages
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A bit on the expensive side when I bought it, but super helpful in my college courses. It's a slow read but interesting at some points, gets better at the end. Had to memorize it for adv maths which was a pain, it has a pattern though. Recommended to people who aren't straight.

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Page 450 - Sjumon seni, which pass for half a mace, or 10 common seni. Simoni seni, of the value of 4 common seni, are made of brass, and are almost as broad as a halfpenny, but thin. The common seni are the size of a farthing, and made of red copper; 60 of them make a mace. Doosa seni is a cast iron coin, in appearance like the last, of the same size and value, but so brittle that it is easily broken by the hand, or breaks in pieces when let fall on the ground. The seni are strung 100 at a time, or, as is...
Page 450 - They differ in size, value, and external appearance, but are always cast, and have a square hole in the middle, by means of which they may be strung together ; and likewise have always broad edges. Of these are current Sjumon seni, which pass for half a mace, or 10 common seni. Simoni seni, of the value of 4 common seni, are made of brass, and are almost as broad as a halfpenny, but thin. The common seni are the size of a farthing, and made of red copper; 60 of them make a mace. Doosa seni is a cast...
Page 478 - Rice, and all other sorts of grain, are sold by the garce of 600 marcals ; and 100 marcals are nearly 18 English bushels. The garce thus equals 13j English quarters. ALLEMPARVA, OR ALLUMPAROA.— This fort is to the N. of Pondicherry, in latitude 12 46' N., longitude 80 4
Page 422 - Measure. brass vessel, which is reduced to a size adequate to contain the exact quantity, and serves afterwards as a standard. The Pucka Seer is formed by mixing...
Page 450 - The coins in one of these parcels are seldom all of one sort, but generally consist of two, three, or more different kinds ; in this case, the larger sorts are strung on first, and then follow the smaller ; the number diminishing in proportion to the number of large pieces in the parcel, which are of greater value than the smaller. The schuit is a silver piece of 4 oz.
Page 459 - Gunter's chain of 100 links, or with a rod of 10 feet, and reduced to Cawnies, Grounds, and square feet, agreeably to the following Table...
Page 432 - Gall, a small piece of silver, worth about fourpence, with characters on one side, is the only coin of the country. Spanish Dollars and Chinese Cash are current.
Page 478 - Pagoda, which was originally equal in value to the Star Pagoda, but its standard has been lowered to \7 Carats, and even less.
Page 473 - The market (Bazar) Mudy, or Moray, and that of the farmers for sale, ought to be the same ; but they differ -j—^ parts of a bushel. Any exact coincidence, however, cannot be expected from the rude implements which the Hindus employ in forming their measures. The different quantities that are called by the same denomination, when used for different purposes, seem to have been contrived CHAPTER with a view...
Page 422 - Rule for reducing the real to the nominal weight :— Multiply the square of the number of tanks by 330, and divide by the number of pearls; the quotient is the number of Bombay chow. By the Cutcha weight are sold jaggery, sugar, tamarinds, turmeric, ginger, mustard, capsicum, betel-nut, assafoetida, garlic, spices, pepper, cardamums, sandal-wood, wool, silk, cotton, thread, ropes, honey, wax, lac, oil, ghee, &c.

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