Allegiance and Identity in a Globalised World

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Fiona Jenkins, Mark Nolan, Kim Rubenstein
Cambridge University Press, Nov 6, 2014 - Law - 688 pages
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Interrogating the concepts of allegiance and identity in a globalised world involves renewing our understanding of membership and participation within and beyond the nation-state. Allegiance can be used to define a singular national identity and common connection to a nation-state. In a global context, however, we need more dynamic conceptions to understand the importance of maintaining diversity and building allegiance with others outside borders. Understanding how allegiance and identity are being reconfigured today provides valuable insights into important contemporary debates around citizenship. This book reveals how public and international law understand allegiance and identity. Each involves viewing the nation-state as fundamental to concepts of allegiance and identity, but they also see the world slightly differently. With contributions from philosophers, political scientists and social psychologists, the result is a thorough appraisal of allegiance and identity in a range of socio-legal contexts.
 

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Contents

Identity at the edge of the constitutional community
31
identitybased constitutional claims
52
Reconciling regional autonomy with national
77
Is Europe still worth fighting for? Allegiance identity
94
migration belonging and place
117
Does law constitute identity? Indigenous allegiance
142
the strangers inside democracy
169
When immigrants and converts are not truly one of
192
the legacy of the nineteenth
354
British child migrants to Australia
381
Temporary migration identity and allegiance
407
whose responsibility?
426
allegiance identity
453
The end of Olympic nationality
478
The perils of judicial construction of identity a critical
497
the ethnic underpinning
522

welfare
221
Finnis in the context of the United
243
Political criminals terrorists and extracriminal regimes
267
migration and counterterrorism
291
is refugee
311
The relevance of nationality in the age of Google Skype
542
inequality as a threat
568
Bibliography
590
Index
659
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About the author (2014)

Fiona Jenkins is a senior lecturer in the School of Philosophy, the Research School of Social Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra.

Mark Nolan is an associate professor at the Australian National University College of Law, Canberra.

Kim Rubenstein is professor and Director of the Centre for International and Public Law, Australian National University College of Law, Canberra.