Black Sun: A Novel

Front Cover
Johnson Books, 2003 - Fiction - 160 pages
55 Reviews
Edward Abbey's first love was to write fiction, and as so many of his friends pointed out, Black Sun was his own personal favorite book. It contains some of his most lyrical writing, and it is unusually gentle and introspective for him.

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What an amazing love story. - Goodreads
Gosh. This is a sweet little love story, a quick read. - Goodreads
Beautifully written love story. - Goodreads
Note that I thought the love story - Goodreads
The beauty of this novel is in the love story. - Goodreads
a weird introduction to abbey. - Goodreads

Review: Black Sun

User Review  - Maia - Goodreads

The story behind this book is really what makes it great in my opinion. If you like Abbey and you don't like this book, go do some research and read it again. Read full review

Review: Black Sun

User Review  - Jackson - Goodreads

Beautiful descriptions of the American West from the POV of a protagonist with my dream job (fire lookout) coupled with a weird, drawn-out sexual fantasy/tragic romance loaded with corny tropes. The ... Read full review

About the author (2003)

Edward Abbey was born January 29, 1927 in Indiana, Pennsylvania, and grew up in nearby Home. After military service in Naples, Italy, from 1945-47, he enrolled in Indiana University of Pennsylvania for a year before traveling to the West. He fell in love with the desert Southwest and eventually attended the University of New Mexico, where he obtained both graduate and post-graduate degrees. Abbey was a Fulbright Fellow from 1951-52. Abbey was an anarchist and a radical environmentalist; these positions are reflected in his writings. His novel Fire on the Mountain won the Western Heritage Award for Best Novel in 1963. Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness, considered by many to be his best work, is nonfiction that reflects Abbey's love for the American Southwest and draws on his experiences as a park ranger. Among his best-known works are The Brave Cowboy (1956), The Monkey Wrench Gang (1975), and The Fool's Progress (1988). In 1966 The Brave Cowboy was made into a movie titled Lonely Are the Brave, starring Kirk Douglas. Two collections of essays have been published since his death in 1989: Confessions of a Barbarian in 1994 and The Serpents of Paradise the following year. In 1987, Abbey was offered the American Academy of Arts and Letters Award, but he declined. Abbey died in March 1989, near Tucson, Arizona, from complications following surgery. He did not want a traditional burial but rather requested to be buried in the Arizona desert, where he could nourish the earth which had been the subject of so many of his works.

Charles Bowden was born in Joliet, Illinois on July 20, 1945. He received an undergraduate degree from the University of Arizona and a master's degree in American intellectual history from the University of Wisconsin. He completed work toward his doctorate there but walked out while defending his dissertation, because he was frustrated with what he felt were uninformed questions from his review committee. He was a reporter for The Tucson Citizen in the early 1980s. He wrote several books during his lifetime including Down by the River: Drugs, Money, Murder and Family, Juárez: The Laboratory of Our Future, A Shadow in the City: Confessions of an Undercover Drug Warrior, Murder City: Ciudad Juárez and the Global Economy's New Killing Fields, and Blood Orchid: An Unnatural History of America. He died on August 30, 2014 at the age of 69.

John Nichols is The Nation's Washington correspondent. He lives in Madison, Wisconsin, and Washington, D.C. and is a co-founder (with Robert McChesney) of the national media reform organization Free Press. He is the author of it's the Media, Stupid and Jews for Buchanan (The New Press).

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