The history of England: from the accession of King George the Third, to the conclusion of peace in the year one thousand seven hundred and eighty-three, Volume 2

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Printed for T. Cadell and W. Davies, 1802 - Great Britain
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Page 156 - All and each of which the aforesaid deputies in behalf of themselves, and their constituents, do claim, demand, and insist on, as their indubitable rights and liberties; which cannot be legally taken from them, altered or abridged by any power whatever, without their own consent, by their representatives in their several provincial legislatures.
Page 120 - The Parliament of Great Britain sits at the head of her extensive empire in two capacities: one as the local legislature of this island, providing for all things at home, immediately, and by no other instrument than the executive power; the other, and I think her nobler capacity, is what I call her imperial character, in which as from the throne of heaven, she superintends all the several inferior legislatures, and guides and controls them all, without annihilating any.
Page 242 - Magnanimity in politics is not seldom the truest wisdom, and a great empire and little minds go ill together. If we...
Page 271 - In our own native land, in defence of the freedom that is our birthright, and which we ever enjoyed till the late violation of it — for the protection of our property, acquired solely by the honest industry of our fore-fathers and ourselves, against violence actually offered, we have taken up arms. We shall lay them down when hostilities shall cease on the part of the aggressors, and all danger of their being renewed shall be removed, and not before.
Page 27 - My defence will be heard at that bar ; but before I sit down, I have one request to make to the House, — that, when they come to decide upon my honour, they will not forget their own.
Page 242 - ... conquests, not by destroying, but by promoting the wealth, the number, the happiness of the human race. Let us get an American revenue as we have got an American empire. English privileges have made it all that it is; English privileges alone will make it all it can be.
Page 240 - I do not examine whether the giving away a man's money be a power excepted and reserved out of the general trust of government, and how far all mankind, in all forms of polity, are entitled to an exercise of that right by the charter of nature. Or whether, on the contrary, a right of taxation is necessarily involved in the general principle of legislation, and inseparable from /the ordinary supreme power. These...
Page 200 - Their force would be most disproportionately exerted against a brave, generous, and united people, with arms in their hands, and courage in their hearts : three millions of people, the genuine descendants of a valiant and pious ancestry, driven to those deserts by the narrow maxims of a superstitious tyranny.
Page 471 - We are the aggressors. We have invaded them. We have invaded them as much as the Spanish Armada invaded England. Mercy cannot do harm; it will seat the King where he ought to be, throned in the hearts of his people ; and millions at home and abroad, now employed in obloquy or revolt, would pray for him.
Page 200 - I cannot but feel the most anxious sensibility for the situation of general Gage, and the troops under his command ; thinking him, as I do, a man of humanity and understanding ; and entertaining as I ever will, the highest respect, the warmest love for the British troops.

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