Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything

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Penguin, 2007 - Economics - 320 pages
2153 Reviews
In this book "Levitt turns conventional economics on its head, stripping away the jargon and calculations of the 'experts' to explore the riddles of everyday life and examine topics such as: how chips are more likely to kill than a terrorist attack ; why sportsmen cheat and how fraud can be spotted ; why violent crime can be linked not to gun laws, policing or poverty, but to abortion ; how money affects elections ; and how the name you give your child can give them an advantage in later life. Ultimately, he shows us that economics is all about how people get what they want, and what makes them do it." -- book jacket.

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Good for the nerds who like random factoids. - LibraryThing
... they cry, "Look at our pictures on the dust jacket! - LibraryThing
Very easy to read and understand. - LibraryThing
The ideas are fun, but the writing is annoying. - LibraryThing
Unlike most books, this one has no plot. - LibraryThing

Review: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (Freakonomics #1)

User Review  - Elina - Goodreads

A book both pointless and sanctimonious, by authors who are, respectively, a narcissist and a sycophant. Glad to have read it, though, so I will never have to go anywhere near it again. Read full review

Review: Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything (Freakonomics #1)

User Review  - Chelsea - Goodreads

It wasn't exactly eye-opening, but there were many things that made a lot of sense. I enjoyed it immensely. Read full review

All 52 reviews »

About the author (2007)

Steven D. Levitt received a B.A. from Harvard University in 1989 and a Ph.D. from M.I.T. in 1994. He is a professor of economics at the University of Chicago where he has been teaching since 1997. He was awarded the 2003 John Bates Clark Medal, an award that recognizes the most outstanding economist in America under the age of 40. He is the coauthor, with Stephen J. Dubner, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. It won the inaugural Quill Award for best business book and a Visionary Award from the National Council on Economic Education. He also wrote SuperFreakonomics and Think Like a Freak with Stephen J. Dubner.

While attending Appalachian State University, Stephen J. Dubner started a rock band that was signed to Arista Records. He eventually stopped playing music to earn an M.F.A. in writing at Columbia University, where he also taught in the English Department. He was an editor and writer at New York magazine and The New York Times before leaving to focus on writing books. He is the coauthor, with Steven D. Levitt, of Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything. It won the inaugural Quill Award for best business book and a Visionary Award from the National Council on Economic Education. He also wrote SuperFreakonomics and Think Like a Freak with Steven D. Levitt. His other works include Turbulent Souls: A Catholic Son's Return to His Jewish Family, Confessions of a Hero-Worshiper, and The Boy with Two Belly Buttons.

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