Journalism in the Civil War Era

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Peter Lang, 2010 - History - 256 pages
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Journalism in the Civil War Era examines the contributions of newspapers and magazines to the American public's understanding of the nation's greatest internal conflict. It documents the effect the Civil War had on journalism, and the effect journalism had on the Civil War. It describes the politics that affected the press, the constraints placed upon it, and the influence of technology. The book discusses the editors and reporters who covered the war, profiling the typical newspaper of the era as well as the response of the press corps to wartime challenges. Providing a broad account of journalism during this period, this book serves as an important reference for scholars and students, and as a supplementary text for courses in journalism history, U.S. press history, civil rights law, and nineteenth century history.

"Bulla and Borchard's analysis of newspapers during the Civil War era shows that this was a transformative time for the press and a perilous time for the relationship between government and the press. The authors argue effectively that `the media that emerged [from the first Modern War] laid the foundation for modern news.'"---David B. Sachsman, West Chair of Excellence and Director of the Symposium on the Nineteenth Century Press, the Civil War, and Free Expression, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

"Bulla and Borchard have produced what has been long needed in the study of U.S. Civil War journalism: a social and cultural history of the American press that goes beyond anecdotal accounts of war news. They explore the nature of the Civil War-era press itself in all its strengths and weaknesses, ranging from political and economic grandstanding and over-the-top verbal grandiloquence to the sheer bravery and determination of a number of editors, publishers, and journalists who viewed their tasks as interpreters and informers of the day's news. Using a mix of carefully selected case studies as well as an extensive study of newspapers both large and small, this highly readable work places the Civil War press squarely where it belongs---as a part of the larger social and cultural experience of midnineteenth century America."---Mary M. Cronin, Department of Journalism, New Mexico State University

"Bulla and Borchard have significantly expanded our understanding of the press, its impact, and its many roles during the Civil War. They shed light on politics, commerce, technology, public opinion, and censorship. Their book reminds us why the press matters most when a nation's fundamental freedoms are at stake."---Michael S. Sweeney, Author, The Military and the Press
 

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Contents

New York and the 1860 Election
23
Horace Greeleys New York Tribune
43
Journalistic Practice and Technological Change
59
Party Press vs Informative Press
111
Everyday News in Wartime
137
Press Suppression North and South
159
Three Newspapers That Supported the President
191
Conclusion Renewing the History of Journalism in the Civil War Era
211
Selected Bibliography
231
Index
241
About the Authors 257
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

David W. Bulla, an associate professor at Iowa State University, has researched primarily nineteenth-century journalism with an emphasis on the limitations of the performance of the press. His first book, Lincoln's Censor, explored press suppression in Indiana during the Civil War. Bulla earned a Ph.D. in mass communication from the University of Florida in 2004, an M.A. in journalism from Indiana University in 2001, and a B.A. in English from UNC-Greensboro in 1983.
Gregory A. Borchard, an associate professor in the Hank Greenspun School of Journalism and Media Studies at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, earned a Ph.D. in mass communication from the University of Florida in 2003. He has published work primarily about the antebellum press, including articles for American Journalism, Journalism History, and reference materials about The New York Tribune. He teaches journalism history, reporting, writing, and methods.

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