Nine Chains to the Moon

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Doubleday, 1971 - Architecture - 346 pages
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The title derives from a statistical cartoon: “If … all of the people of the world were to stand upon one another’s shoulders, they would make nine complete chains between the earth and the moon. If it is not so far to the moon, then it is not so far to the limits—whatever, whenever or wherever they may be.” This is Fuller’s first book and one of the few he wrote as a book and not as a composite of articles, transcripts, or letters. Many of his original and lifelong metaphors and strategies were introduced in this volume. A projected final chapter, “From Bibble to Bible to Babble,” was rejected by the publishers because its concrete poetry format was deemed too radical for inclusion in a trade book. The end papers anticipate the Dymaxion airocean world map. There are five appendices documenting Fuller’s virtuosity in large patterns: (1) on the chronology of scientific events from the ancient world to 1936; (2) coincidence of U.S. population centers with isotherm of 32░ F; (3) U.S. to become world’s greatest exporter; (4) world copper production and consumption; and (5) growth of U.S. industry correlated with inventions.

Description by Ed Applewhite, courtesy of The Estate of Buckminster Fuller

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Contents

Science
112
Pattern
150
The Warehouse Era
156
Copyright

24 other sections not shown

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About the author (1971)

Buckminster Fuller (1895 - 1983) was an architect, engineer, geometrician, cartographer, philosopher, futurist, inventor of the famous geodesic dome, and one of the most brilliant thinkers of his time. Fuller was renowned for his comprehensive perspective on the world's problems. For more than five decades, he developed pioneering solutions reflecting his commitment to the potential of innovative design to create technology that does "more with less" and thereby improve human lives. The author of nearly 30 books, he spent much of his life traveling the world lecturing and discussing his ideas with thousands of audiences. In 1983, shortly before his death, he received the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest civilian honor, with a citation acknowledging that his "contributions as a geometrician, educator, and architect-designer are benchmarks of accomplishment in their fields." After Fuller's death, a team of chemists won the Nobel Prize for discovering a new carbon molecule with a structure similar to that of a geodesic dome, they named the molecule "buckminsterfullerene"—now commonly referred to in the scientific community as the buckyball.

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