Introduction to Phenomenological Research

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Indiana University Press, May 3, 2005 - Philosophy - 272 pages
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Introduction to Phenomenological Research, volume 17 of Martin Heidegger's Gesamtausgabe, contains his first lectures given at Marburg in the winter semester of 1923--1924. In these lectures, Heidegger introduces the notion of phenomenology by tracing it back to Aristotle's treatments of phainomenon and logos. This extensive commentary on Aristotle is an important addition to Heidegger's ongoing interpretations which accompany his thinking during the period leading up to Being and Time. Additionally, these lectures develop critical differences between Heidegger's phenomenology and that of Descartes and Husserl and elaborate questions of facticity, everydayness, and flight from existence that are central in his later work. Here, Heidegger dismantles the history of ontology and charts a new course for phenomenology by defining and distinguishing his own methods.

 

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Contents

PART
3
The Aristotelian determination of Xoyog
9
Presentday phenomenology in Husserls selfinterpretation
32
The theme of consciousness in the Logical Investigations
39
Husserls polemic with contemporary philosophy in the essay
45
Clarification of the problems as purification and radicalization of their
52
11 Order of the inquiry and clue to the explication of the structure of
59
Critique of historicism on the path of the clarification of problems
66
The path of the caring dubitatio in the First Meditation subject to
176
The caring search in the Second Meditation for what the ego sum
184
PART THREE
191
connection and uniform basic tendency in
205
Chapter Three
208
APPENDIX
221
to p 21
224
to p 30
225

Making more precise what care about already known knowledge is
72
RETURN TO DESCARTES
79
Destruction as the path of the interpretation of existence Three tasks
85
curiosity
91
Descartes classification of the variety of cogitationes The judicium
98
The question of the being of the falsum and error
107
error as res and as privatio as detrimental
116
The genuine being of the verum as convenientia in intellectus
126
In what sense the verum is in the intellectus De veritate q 1 art 9
132
The ways of being able to determine Gods being from
142
Chapter Five
148
The origin of clarity and distinctness Descartes idea of science and
156
The care of knowing as care about certainty as mistaking oneself
168
Chapter
174
to p 36
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to p 65
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to p 69
229
to p 74
230
to p 77
231
to p 93
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to p 106
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to p 116
235
to p 123
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to p 160
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to p 197
239
to p 210
240
Editors Afterword
245
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About the author (2005)

Daniel O. Dahlstrom, Professor of Philosophy at Boston University, is author of Heidegger's Concept of Truth.

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