Collected Poems

Front Cover
Buccaneer Books, 1992 - Poetry - 738 pages
6 Reviews
Compiled by her sister after the poet's death and originally published in 1956, this is the definitive edition of Millay, right up through her last poem, "Mine the Harvest."

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
3
4 stars
2
3 stars
1
2 stars
0
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - RussellBittner - LibraryThing

I would submit that Edna St. Vincent Millay may be the most underrated poet in the English language. Was she a formalist, and therefore out of vogue? Too bad. Was she a naughty girl, and therefore ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - amanaceerdh - LibraryThing

not my favorite poet, but enjoyed some of her poems. one of my faves: "ebb" i know what my heart is like since your love died; it is like a hollow ledge Holding a little pool Left there by the tide, a little tepid pool drying inward from the edge. Read full review

Other editions - View all

About the author (1992)

Edna St. Vincent Millay 1892-1950 Edna St. Vincent Millay, American poet, dramatist, lyricist, lecturer, and playwright, was born on February 22, 1892 in Rockland, Maine, and educated at Barnard College and at Vassar College, where she earned her B. A. (Her poem "Renascence" won fourth place in a contest and was published in The Lyric Year in 1912; this resulted in a scholarship to Vassar.) Millay's first volume of poetry, "Renascence and Other Poems," was published in 1917. In 1923, "The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver" won her a Pulitzer Prize in Poetry. Other works include: "A Few Figs from Thistles;" "Sonnets in American Poetry," "A Miscellany," "The Lamp and the Bell" and "There Are No Islands Any More." Millay also wrote the libretto for "The King's Henchman," one of the few American grand operas. Edna St. Vincent Millay married Eugen Jan Boissevain in 1923. Shortly after, they purchased a farm in upstate New York, which they called Steepletop. Millay lived here for the rest of her life, composing some of her finest work in a little shack separate from the main house. Boissevain died in 1949. Millay died of a heart attack in her home on October 19, 1950.

Bibliographic information