The Ghost Garden: A Novel

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Frederick A. Stokes Company, 1918 - American fiction - 299 pages
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Page 130 - Without company and without sleep, that fair lady shall give him when he hath done, the first thing that he will wish of earthly things; and that hath been proved often times. And one time 'befell, that a King of Armenia, that was a worthy knight and doughty man, and a noble prince, watched that hawk some time. And at the end of seven days and seven nights the lady came to him and bade him wish, for he had well deserved it. And he answered that he was great lord enough and well in peace, and had...
Page 130 - Armenia, that was a worthy knight and doughty man, and a noble prince, watched that hawk some time. And at the end of seven days and seven nights the lady came to him and bade him wish, for he had well deserved it. And he answered that he was great lord enough and well in peace, and had enough of worldly riches; and therefore he would wish none other thing, but the body of that fair lady to have it at his will.
Page 130 - And he answered that he was great lord the now, and well in peace, and had enough of worldly riches ; and therefore he would wish none other thing, but the body of that fair lady, to have it at his will. And she answered him, that he knew not what he asked ; and said, that he was a fool, to desire that he might not have : for she said, that he should not ask, but earthly thing : for she was no earthly thing, but a ghostly thing.
Page 129 - Pharsipee, that belongeth to the lordship of Cruk, that is a rich lord and a good Christian man ; where men find a sparrow-hawk upon a perch right fair and right well made, and a fair lady of faerie that keepeth it.
Page 130 - And never since, neither the King of Armenia nor the country were never in peace ; ne they had never sith plenty of goods ; and they have been sithen always under tribute of the Saracens. Also the son of a poor man watched that hawk and wished that he might chieve well, and to be happy to merchandise. And the lady granted him. And he became the most rich and the most famous merchant that might be on sea or on earth.
Page 129 - And in that country is an old castle, that stands upon a rock, the which is cleped the Castle of the Sparrowhawk, that is beyond the city of Layays, beside the town of Pharsipee, that belongeth to the lordship of Cruk ; that is a rich lord and a good Christian man ; where men find a sparrowhawk upon a perch right fair, and right well made ; and a fair Lady of...
Page 205 - ... fair lady, to have it at his will. And she answered him, that he knew not what he asked, and said that he was a fool to desire that he might not have ; for she said that he should not ask but earthly thing, for she was none earthly thing, but a ghostly thing.
Page 111 - She lay quite still on his breast, her face, white and clear as pearl, even to the lips, upturned to his, her look clinging to his, as if that steady gaze were all that held her from slipping into an abyss.
Page 106 - The next instant, she had slipped into the arms held out to her, as sweetly, as inevitably, as water slips into some natural hollow. He felt her all fluent in the refuge of his arms — as if love had dissolved her, body as well as spirit.

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