Purple Hibiscus: A Novel

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Anchor Books, 2004 - Fiction - 307 pages
58 Reviews
Fifteen-year-old Kambili's world is circumscribed by the high walls and frangipani trees of her family compound. Her wealthy Catholic father, under whose shadow Kambili lives, while generous and politically active in the community, is repressive and fanatically religious at home.

When Nigeria begins to fall apart under a military coup, Kambili's father sends her and her brother away to stay with their aunt, a University professor, whose house is noisy and full of laughter. There, Kambili and her brother discover a life and love beyond the confines of their father's authority. The visit will lift the silence from their world and, in time, give rise to devotion and defiance that reveal themselves in profound and unexpected ways. This is a book about the promise of freedom; about the blurred lines between childhood and adulthood; between love and hatred, between the old gods and the new. 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quiBee - LibraryThing

This is the first novel by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, the second one I've read. She is a very fine writer. The story is a coming of age of a young girl in Nigeria. It opens on a scene full of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mirikayla - LibraryThing

I read all about the horrific civil war in Half of a Yellow Sun, but nothing in any of Adichie's books has been as hard for me to read as the religious and physical abuse in this one. I felt so sick ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
19
Section 3
27
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie grew up in Nigeria, where she attended medical school for two years at the University of Nigeria before coming to the United States. A 2003 O. Henry Prize winner, Adichie was shortlisted for the 2002 Caine Prize for African Writing. Her work has been selected by the Commonwealth Broadcasting Association and the BBC Short Story Awards, and has appeared in various literary publications, including Zoetrope and the Iowa Review. She now divides her time between the U.S. and Nigeria.

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