The Responsible Self: An Essay in Christian Moral Philosophy

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Westminster John Knox Press, 1999 - Religion - 183 pages
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The Responsible Self was H. Richard Niebuhr's most important work in Christian ethics. In it he probes the most fundamental character of the moral life and it stands today as a landmark contribution to the field.

The Library of Theological Ethics series focuses on what it means to think theologically and ethically. It presents a selection of important and otherwise unavailable texts in easily accessible form. Volumes in this series will enable sustained dialogue with predecessors though reflection on classic works in the field.

 

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Contents

Preface by Richard R Niebuhr
1
On Christian Moral Philosophy
42
Responsibility in Society
69
The Responsible Self in Time and History
90
Responsibility in Absolute Dependence
108
Responsibility in Sin and Salvation
127
Appendix
148
Index
179
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About the author (1999)

H. Richard Niebuhr was one of the most influential American Protestant theologians of the 20th century and a legendary professor at Yale who was considered a leading authority on ethics and the American church. He was a passionate advocate for living out one's Christian faith authentically in the context of real world of today. He influenced many of our leading contemporary ethical leaders such as Stephen Carter, Garry Wills, and Michael Novak.The younger brother of the theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, H. Richard was educated at Eden Theological Seminary and Washington University in St. Louis, Yale Divinity School, and Yale University, where he was one of the first students to receive a Ph.D. in religion (1924). Ordained a pastor of the Evangelical and Reformed Church in 1916, he taught at Eden Theological Seminary (1919 22; 1927 31) and also served as president of Elmhurst College (1924 27). From 1931 he taught theology and Christian ethics at Yale Divinity School.

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