One Hundred Years of Land Values in Chicago: The Relationship of the Growth of Chicago to the Rise of Its Land Values, 1830-1933

Front Cover
Beard Books, Sep 1, 2000 - Business & Economics - 519 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

III
3
IV
7
V
23
VI
45
VII
53
VIII
74
IX
81
X
82
XXVI
297
XXVII
344
XXVIII
353
XXIX
368
XXX
369
XXXI
372
XXXII
377
XXXIII
403

XI
88
XII
101
XIII
117
XIV
125
XV
128
XVI
132
XVII
141
XVIII
142
XIX
159
XX
181
XXI
184
XXII
196
XXIII
232
XXIV
279
XXV
295
XXXIV
405
XXXV
407
XXXVI
423
XXXVII
427
XXXVIII
441
XXXIX
449
XL
456
XLI
460
XLII
465
XLIII
467
XLIV
470
XLV
497
XLVI
503
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 12 - There is one improvement to be made, however, in this section of the country, which will greatly influence the permanent value of property in Chicago. I allude to a canal from the head of Lake Michigan to the head of steam navigation on the Illinois, the route of which has been long since surveyed. The distance to be overcome is something like ninety miles; and when you remember that the...
Page 7 - A very important advantage (of it), and which some will perhaps find it hard to credit, is that we can quite easily go to Florida in boats, and by a very good navigation. There would be but one canal to make by cutting only one-half a league of prairie to pass from the lake of the Illinois (Michigan) into St.
Page 9 - ... Portage." From the lake one passes by a channel formed by the junction of several small streams or gullies, and navigable about two leagues to the edge of the prairie. Beyond this at a distance of a quarter of a league to the westward is a little lake a league and a half in length, divided into two parts by a beaver dam. From this lake issues a little stream which, after twining in and out for half a league across the rushes, falls into the Chicago River, which in turn empties into the Illinois....
Page 18 - Many were the scenes which here presented themselves, portraying the habits of both the red men and the demi-civilized beings around them. The interior of the village was one chaos of mud, rubbish, and confusion. Frame and clapboard houses were springing up daily under the active axes and hammers of the speculators, and piles of lumber announced the preparation for yet other edifices of an equally light character. Races occurred frequently on a piece of level sward without the village, on which temporary...

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information