Lees' Loss Prevention in the Process Industries: Hazard Identification, Assessment and Control, Volume 1

Front Cover
Sam Mannan
Butterworth-Heinemann, 2004 - Business & Economics - 4008 pages
4 Reviews
Over the last three decades the process industries have grown very rapidly, with corresponding increases in the quantities of hazardous materials in process, storage or transport. Plants have become larger and are often situated in or close to densely populated areas. Increased hazard of loss of life or property is continually highlighted with incidents such as Flixborough, Bhopal, Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, the Phillips 66 incident, and Piper Alpha to name but a few.

The field of Loss Prevention is, and continues to, be of supreme importance to countless companies, municipalities and governments around the world, because of the trend for processing plants to become larger and often be situated in or close to densely populated areas, thus increasing the hazard of loss of life or property. This book is a detailed guidebook to defending against these, and many other, hazards. It could without exaggeration be referred to as the "bible" for the process industries. This is THE standard reference work for chemical and process engineering safety professionals. For years, it has been the most complete collection of information on the theory, practice, design elements, equipment, regulations and laws covering the field of process safety. An entire library of alternative books (and cross-referencing systems) would be needed to replace or improve upon it, but everything of importance to safety professionals, engineers and managers can be found in this all-encompassing reference instead.

Frank Lees' world renowned work has been fully revised and expanded by a team of leading chemical and process engineers working under the guidance of one of the world's chief experts in this field. Sam Mannan is professor of chemical engineering at Texas A&M University, and heads the Mary Kay O'Connor Process Safety Center at Texas A&M. He received his MS and Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Oklahoma, and joined the chemical engineering department at Texas A&M University as a professor in 1997. He has over 20 years of experience as an engineer, working both in industry and academia

New detail is added to chapters on fire safety, engineering, explosion hazards, analysis and suppression, and new appendices feature more recent disasters. The many thousands of references have been updated along with standards and codes of practice issued by authorities in the US, UK/Europe and internationally. In addition to all this, more regulatory relevance and case studies have been included in this edition. Written in a clear and concise style, Loss Prevention in the Process Industries covers traditional areas of personal safety as well as the more technological aspects and thus provides balanced and in-depth coverage of the whole field of safety and loss prevention.

* A must-have standard reference for chemical and process engineering safety professionals

* The most complete collection of information on the theory, practice, design elements, equipment and laws that pertain to process safety

* Only single work to provide everything; principles, practice, codes, standards, data and references needed by those practicing in the field
 

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Excellent companion for process safety and loss prevention engineers. Bible of safety engineering

Contents

Hazard Incident and Loss
2-2
Seismicity Assessment and Earthquake Prediction A1515
2-15
Design Basis Earthquake A1517
2-17
Legislation and Law
3-3
Major Hazard Control
4-4
Nuclear Installations A1517
4-17
Economics and Insurance
5-1
Management and Management
6-1
Pilot Plants A101
10-1
Pilot Plant Uses Types and Strategies A102
10-2
Pilot Plant Features and Hazards A103
10-3
Pilot Plant Scaleup A104
10-4
Pilot Plant Operation A107
10-7
Safety Health and the Environment A111
11-1
Common Responsibilities A112
11-2
Some Conflicts A116
11-6

Human Error 1446
6-14
Reliability Engineering
7-3
Uncertainty in Results A239
7-9
Hazard Identification
8-1
Remedial Measures
8-76
Hazard Assessment
9-1
Presentation of Results A239
9-4
Process Installations A1518
9-18
Critiques A820
9-70
Browns Ferry Incident A239
10-9
Plant Siting and Layout 101
10-10
Process Design 111
1-1
Pressure System Design 121
12-6
Control System Design 131
13-1
Control 2369
13-23
Human Factors and Human
14-14
15
15-1
Critical Assumptions A2312
15-12
Trials 15215
15-215
Critiques A2314
15-216
Notation A1521
15-243
San Carlos de la Rapita A161
16-1
Fire 161
16-16
The Camp Site A162
16-291
Contents of Volume 3
16-335
351
16-339
Contents of Volume 2
16-340
The Road Tanker A162
16-342
Case Histories A11
17-1
Explosion 175
17-17
Toxic Release 181
18-5
Notation A820
18-20
ACMH Model Licence
19-38
Plant Operation 201
20-1
Equipment Maintenance
20-21
22
22-1
1
22-22
LNG Storage 2235
22-36
CCPS
22-42
Pressure Storage
22-48
Bunds 2255
22-57
Loading and Unloading Facilities 2261
22-64
Chemicals 2265
25-22
Accident Research 261
26-1
Storage Case Histories 2271
27-22
Computer Aids 291
29-1
Artificial Intelligence and Expert
30-3
7
30-36
Incident Investigation 311
31-2
Emergency Planning 241
31-24
Inherently Safer Design 321
32-1
Reactive Chemicals 331
33-33
The Emergency and the Aftermath A163
34-3
Safety Instrumented Systems 341
34-34
NFPA Publications 2415
35-24
Plant Commissioning
35-35
LPG Storage Hazard Assessment
35-36
A820
35-41
The Fire and Explosions 2 A163
35-42
Model Conditions for a Possible Licensing
35-43
Laboratories A91
1-1
Incident Sources A12
1-2
Incident Databases A15
1-5
Reporting of Incidents A16
1-6
Incident Diagrams Plans and Maps A17
1-7
Some Principal Incidents A18
1-8
Report A171
1-35
B Series A169
1-69
Some Other Incidents and Problems A180
1-80
Flixborough A21
1-81
Inspection 191
1-83
The Explosion 1 A26
1-89
The Investigation A27
1-90
Some Lessons of Flixborough A213
1-93
Critiques A217
1-97
Seveso A31
1-100
TCDD and Its Properties A33
1-101
Previous Incidents Involving TCP and TCDD A34
1-102
Events Prior to the Release A35
1-103
The Emergency and the Immediate Aftermath A36
1-104
The Investigation A38
1-106
The Release 2 A39
1-107
The Later Aftermath Contamination and Decontamination A310
1-108
Some Lessons of Seveso A311
1-109
Mexico City A41
1-114
The Fire and Explosion 1 A43
1-115
The Emergency A46
1-118
The Fire and Explosion 2 A47
1-119
Bhopal A51
1-122
MIC and Its Properties A54
1-124
The Release A56
1-126
The Emergency and the Immediate Aftermath A57
1-127
The Investigations A57
1-128
Pasadena A61
1-134
Some Lessons of Pasadena A64
1-136
Canvey Reports A71
7-1
First Canvey Report A72
7-2
Identified Hazards A76
7-6
Hazard Models and Risk Estimates A77
7-7
Assessed Risks and Actions A726
7-26
Response to Report A730
7-30
Second Canvey Report A731
7-31
Notation A733
7-33
Rijnmond Report A81
7-36
Installations and Activities A84
7-38
Personal Safety 251
9-2
Laboratory Personnel A93
9-3
Laboratory Hazards A94
9-4
Laboratory Design A95
9-5
Laboratory Equipment A96
9-6
Laboratory Storage and Waste Disposal A97
9-7
Laboratory Fire and Explosion Protection A99
9-9
Pollution of the Environment A11 4 Legislation A117
11-7
EC Directives A119
11-9
Environmental Management A1110
10
Environmental Hazard Assessment A1111
11
Environmental Impact Assessment A1112
12
Environmental Economics A1113
13
Chemicals Transport Transformation Fate and Loading A1114
14
Waste Minimization A1115
15
Gaseous Effluents A1117
17
Liquid Effluents A1118
18
Hazardous and Solid Wastes A1120
20
Fugitive Emissions A1122
22
Odours A1123
23
Transport A1124
24
Marine Pollution A1125
25
Notation A1126
26
Noise A121
12-1
Regulatory Controls A122
12-2
Noise Control Terminology A123
12-3
Noise Control A124
12-4
Notation A126
12-6
Safety Factors for Simple Relief Systems A131
14-1
Event Data A84
14-4
Collection of Data A145
14-5
Status of Data A146
14-6
Uncertainty of Data A147
14-7
Inventory A1413
14-13
Inventory of Equipment in Plants A1414
14-14
Pipework A1415
14-15
Heat Exchangers A1416
14-16
Valves A1419
14-19
Instruments A1422
2
Process Computers A1426
6
Fire and Gas Detection Systems A1427
7
Fire Protection Systems A1428
8
Emergency Shutdown Systems A1431
11
Utility Systems A1432
12
LNG Plants A1433
13
Ignition A1435
15
Explosion following ignition A1436
16
Fires A1437
17
Transport A1438
18
Earthquakes A151
15-1
Earthquake Geophysics A152
15-2
Earthquake Characterization A155
15-5
Earthquake Effects A156
15-6
Earthquake Damage A158
15-8
Ground Motion Characterization A159
15-9
Ground Soils and Foundations A1511
1
Earthquakeresistant Design A1512
2
Substances and Activities A172
17-2
Injury Relations A176
17-6
Rail Transport A178
17-8
Hazard Models A84
17-9
Ports A1710
17-10
Transport of Explosives A1712
17-12
Risk Criteria A1714
17-14
Plant Commissioning 192
17-19
Risk Evaluation and Remedial Measures A1721
17-21
Notation 2277
17-22
Offshore Process Safety A181
18-1
North Sea Offshore Regulatory
18-2
Administration 182
18-4
Offshore Emergency Planning 187
18-7
Offshore Event Data 188
18-8
Piper Alpha A191
18-9
Personnel A192
18-10
The Field and the Platform A193
18-11
The Process and the Plant A194
18-12
The Explosion the Escalation and the Rescue A197
18-15
The Investigation A198
18-19
Recommendations on the Offshore Safety Regime A1914
18-22
Transport 231
18-23
Radioactivity A203
18-25
Nuclear Industry A204
18-26
Nuclear System Reliability A205
18-27
Nuclear Hazard Assessment A206
18-28
Nuclear Pressure Systems A207
18-29
Nuclear Emergency Planning A208
18-30
Nuclear Incidents A208
18-32
Three Mile Island A211
18-34
Events Prior to the Excursion A214
18-36
The Emergency and the Aftermath A217
18-39
The Investigations A217
18-40
Some Lessons of Three Mile Island A2111
18-44
Chernobyl A221
18-47
The Site and the Works A222
18-48
Events Prior to the Release A223
18-49
The Emergency and the Immediate Aftermath A224
18-50
The Investigations A227
18-53
The Later Aftermath A229
18-55
Rasmussen Report A231
18-57
Earlier Studies A232
18-58
Risk Assessment Methodology A232
18-59
Injury Relations A84
18-63
HSE Guidelines on Developments
1
Individual Assessments A84
4
Fault Trees A234
6
The Siting of Developments in the Vicinities
24-11
Assessed Risks A817
24-17
Institutional
8-13
Road Transport 2314
8-23
Information Sources A291
1
Selected Organizations Relevant to Safety
11
Process Safety Management
31-1
The Risk Management Program A322
31-8
Appendix 34
31-17
Common Mode Failure A234
497
Human Error A234
4
Rare Events A234
32
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About the author (2004)

M. Sam Mannan, PhD, PE, CSP, is a chemical engineering professor and director of the Mary Kay O'Connor Process Safety Center at Texas A&M University. He is an internationally recognized expert on process safety and risk assessment. His research interests include hazard assessment and risk analysis, flammable and toxic gas cloud dispersion modeling, inherently safer design, reactive chemicals and runČaway reactions, aerosols, and abnormal situation management.

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