Nature and the English Diaspora: Environment and History in the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Sep 28, 1999 - History - 350 pages
0 Reviews
This book is a comparative history of the development of ideas about nature, particularly of the importance of native nature in the Anglo settler countries of the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. It examines the development of natural history, settlers' adaptations to the end of expansion, scientists' shift from natural history to ecology, and the rise of environmentalism. Addressing not only scientific knowledge but also popular issues from hunting to landscape painting, this book explores the ways in which English-speaking settlers looked at nature in their new lands.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

MAKING THE LAND FAMILIAR
19
European Models in New Lands
46
SECTION TWO BEYOND CONQUEST
71
National Nature 18801920
97
Changing Science 18801930
139
FINDING FIRM GROUND
165
National Nature 19201940
190
An Ecological Perspective 19201950
219
NEW KNOWLEDGE NEW ACTION
245
The Debate Transformed
275
The Upshot
307
Bibliography
315
139
321
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information