On the Cosmic Horizon: Ten Great Mysteries for Third Millennium Astronomy

Front Cover
Addison Wesley Longman, 2001 - Science - 209 pages
3 Reviews

Share the wonder of the ten great mysteries of 21st century astronomy -- with an astronomer as your guide!

  • Are we alone? What is the fate of the universe?
  • Is the inflationary big bang theory true? What is the universe really made of?
  • Compelling explanations for any educated reader -- even those with no science or math background!

Outside of religion, no human pursuit deals with deeper questions of existence than astronomy, and few areas of science compare in capturing the public imagination. Today, however, the pace of discovery is so rapid that even professional astronomers have difficulty staying current. In this book, an astronomer and award-winning, highly acclaimed teacher shares the ten deepest mysteries that motivate astronomy today -- from the quest for life outside Earth, to the ultimate fate of the universe. It's an awesome collection of mysteries, and Jeffrey Bennett explains each one with remarkable clarity, enabling any educated citizen to share in the wonder, no matter how little scientific or mathematics background they may have. Is there life elsewhere in our solar system? Where are the Sun's missing neutrinos? What does the universe look like? How do galaxies evolve? Are Earth-like planets common? What makes gamma-ray bursts? Is the inflationary big bang theory true? What is the universe made out of -- and what is its fate? Every mystery is framed with a story that draws upon history or an especially resonant metaphor, then explained in detail, but simply enough for those coming to astronomy for the first time.

A teacher and an author, Jeffrey Bennett has taught college courses in astronomy, physics, mathematics, and education, as well as writing introductory astronomy and general mathematics with Addison Wesley including: The Cosmic Perspective, The Cosmic Perspective-Brief, Statistical Reasoning for Everyday Life, and Using and Understanding Mathematics.

Jeffrey Bennett earned a B.A. in biophysics from the University of California San Diego, and an M.S. and Ph.D in astrophysics from the University of Colorado. He served for two years as a Visiting Senior Scientist at NASA Headquarters, where he developed educational programs for the Hubble Space Telescope and other astronomical missions. He also led the creation of the Colorado Scale Model Solar System, a one to ten billion scale model of the solar system, and is now consulting with the Challenger Center for Space Science Education, the Smithsonian Institution, and NASA on a project to build similar scale models for the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and other locations around the world. He has recently begun writing science books for a popular audience and for children.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: On the Cosmic Horizon: Ten Great Mysteries for Third Millennium Astronomy

User Review  - Goodreads

If I were ever to teach an introductory astronomy class (which I haven't ruled out) I would use this as the textbook. Instead of listing off planetary moons or cute trivia or other such nonsense, it ... Read full review

Review: On the Cosmic Horizon: Ten Great Mysteries for Third Millennium Astronomy

User Review  - Christopher Obert - Goodreads

Another great astronomy book by Jeffrey Bennett! Mr. Bennett does his best to make the ten great mysteries easy to understand, while at the same time, keeping the majesty. I found myself looking into the reflection and seeing infinity. Read full review

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2001)

A teacher and an author, Jeffrey Bennett has taught college courses in astronomy, physics, mathematics, and education, as well as writing introductory astronomy and general mathematics with Addison Wesley including: The Cosmic Perspective, The Cosmic Perspective-Brief, Statistical Reasoning for Everyday Life, and Using and Understanding Mathematics.

Jeffrey Bennett earned a B.A. in biophysics from the University of California San Diego, and an M.S. and Ph.D in astrophysics from the University of Colorado. He served for two years as a Visiting Senior Scientist at NASA Headquarters, where he developed educational programs for the Hubble Space Telescope and other astronomical missions. He also led the creation of the Colorado Scale Model Solar System, a one to ten billion scale model of the solar system, and is now consulting with the Challenger Center for Space Science Education, the Smithsonian Institution, and NASA on a project to build similar scale models for the National Mall in Washington, D.C., and other locations around the world. He has recently begun writing science books for a popular audience and for children.


Bibliographic information