Menander, the Principal Fragments

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Putnam's Sons, 1921 - Drama - 539 pages
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Page 514 - CALLIMACHUS AND LYCOPHRON, trans, by AW Mair, and ARATUS, trans, by GR Mair. CLEMENT OF ALEXANDRIA. Trans, by Rev. GW Butterworth. DAPHNIS AND CHLOE. Thornley's Translation revised by JM Edmonds; and PARTHENIUS. Trans, by S. Gaselee.
Page 514 - ST. JOHN DAMASCENE : BARLAAM AND IOASAPH. Trans, by the Rev. GR Woodward and Harold Mattingly. STRABO : GEOGRAPHY. Trans, by Horace L. Jones. 8 Vols.
Page 303 - for he expects him to be asking for something" (Adelphi B 4K). 68. The poet has little good to say of the beggar: The man who first invented the art of supporting beggars made many wretched. For the obvious thing were that he who cannot live without misery should die.20 (Halieis 14K) For "he who holds out his hand to have coin dropped in is ready for evil, even though he deny it
Page 514 - PAUSANIAS : DESCRIPTION OF GREECE. Trans, by WHS Jones. 5 Vols. and Companion Vol. Vol. I.
Page 39 - That he might profit by twelve drachmas for himself, Through all the coming ages they had been unknown Who were such great ones and of such a pedigree. And so it is not fitting, father, that I here , . Should rear his body and that Davus seize me.anwhile His life's hope for the future, make it disappear. A youth about to wed his sister once was stopped By just such tokens. One a mother found and saved, And one a brother. Since, O father, all men's lives Are liable to dangers, we must watch, look...
Page 516 - BL Ullman. CICERO, DE NATURA DEORUM. H. Rackham. CICERO, DE ORATORE, ORATOR, BRUTUS. Charles Stuttaford. CICERO, IN PISONEM, PRO SCAURO, PRO FONTEIO, PRO MILONE, etc.
Page 325 - Blessed is the man who has both mind and money, for he employs the latter well for what he should.
Page 514 - THEOPHRASTUS: ENQUIRY INTO PLANTS. Trans. by Sir Arthur Hort, Bart. 2 Vols. THUCYDIDES. Trans, by CF Smith. 4 Vols.
Page 53 - Charisius does not care for her, is not content merely to have lived luxuriously at his expense: Let go of me! Please, sir! Don't give me trouble, please! I made myself, it seems, poor me, a laughing stock And knew it not, I looked for love, instead of that The fellow hates me with a superhuman hate; Even his banquet couch no more he lets me share; Poor wretch! I lie apart . . . (Ep. 213-218) Chrysis of the Samia, when dismissed by Demea, can not understand what has come over this man she loves,...
Page 514 - ASCLEPIODOTUS AND ONASANDER. Trans, by The Illinois Greek Club. AESCHINES. Trans, by CD Adams. AESCHYLUS. Trans, by H. Weir Smyth. 2 Vols. (Vol. I.

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