Here Comes Everybody: The Power of Organizing Without Organizations

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Penguin, Feb 28, 2008 - Technology & Engineering - 352 pages
3 Reviews
An extraordinary exploration of how technology can empower social and political organizers

For the first time in history, the tools for cooperating on a global scale are not solely in the hands of governments or institutions. The spread of the internet and mobile phones are changing how people come together and get things done—and sparking a revolution that, as Clay Shirky shows, is changing what we do, how we do it, and even who we are. Here, we encounter a whoman who loses her phone and recruits an army of volunteers to get it back from the person who stole it. A dissatisfied airline passenger who spawns a national movement by taking her case to the web. And a handful of kids in Belarus who create a political protest that the state is powerless to stop. Here Comes Everybody is a revelatory examination of how the wildfirelike spread of new forms of social interaction enabled by technology is changing the way humans form groups and exist within them. A revolution in social organization has commenced, and Clay Shirky is its brilliant chronicler.

"Drawing from anthropology, economic theory and keen observation, [Shirky] makes a strong case that new communication tools are making once-impossible forms of group action possible . . . [an] extraordinarily perceptive new book." -Minneapolis Star Tribune

"Mr. Shirky writes cleanly and convincingly about the intersection of technological innovation and social change." -New York Observer
 

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How social media is revolutionizing everything

User Review  - KTrimbach - Borders

Clay Shirky has a very good grasp of how the internet, and particularly social media, is changing society. It is a revolution no less seismic than the invention of the printing press and it portends a ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Unless you've been living under a rock over the past few years, you would have noticed an explosion in ways that people interact, collaborate and exchange information online. We are probably undergoing the greatest technological shift since the advent of e-mail, and it'd probably hard to grasp all the ramifications that profound new change is heralding. Every year now, or sometimes every month, several new information terms and products enter our collective consciousness, terms like blog, Twitter, Digg, Facebook, MySpace, collaborative filtering, crowdsourcing, online social networking, and many, many others. It becomes harder and harder to keep track of what each one of them means, little less of how to use it or whether to use it at all. Many of them may just be passing fads, but it is hard to deny that put together they are part of some larger trend. However, it may not be so obvious what this trend is all about and one often can't see the forest from all the trees. From that point, Clay Shirky's book "Here Comes Everybody" can be best understood as a field guide that will take you on a guided tour of this new forest and explain its immediate implications for how we live our lives, work or play. It is a very well written book, written in an easy-going journalistic style. It brings forth many real-life stories and case analyses that help with explaining these recent trends. The book is informative without being bogged down in technical jargon. It is also a very gripping read, and once one starts reading it is hard to put down. I would recommend it to everyone who is interested in getting a big picture of where we are headed in terms of collaborative technologies. 

Contents

CHAPTER 1ITTAKES AVILLAGE TOFINDAPHONE
CHAPTER 3EVERYONE IS A MEDIA OUTLET
CHAPTER 4PUBLISH THENFILTER CHAPTER 5 PERSONAL MOTIVATION MEETS COLLABORATIVE
COLLECTIVE ACTION AND INSTITUTIONAL CHALLENGES
CHAPTER 8SOLVING SOCIAL DILEMMAS
CHAPTER 9FITTING OUR TOOLS TO A SMALL WORLD
FAILURE FOR FREE
PROMISE TOOL BARGAIN
EPILOGUE
AcknowledgementsBIBLIOGRAPHY
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Clay Shirky teaches at the Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU, where he researches the interrelated effects of our social and technological networks. He has consulted with a variety of Fortune 500 companies working on network design, including Nokia, Lego, the BBC, Newscorp, Microsoft, as well as the Library of Congress, the U.S. Navy, and the Libyan government. His writings have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, the Times of London, Harvard Business Review, Business 2.0, and Wired, and he is a regular keynote speaker at tech conferences. Mr. Shirky lives in Brooklyn.

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