Town Planning in Practice: An Introduction to the Art of Designing Cities and Suburbs

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T. F. Unwin, 1909 - Cities and towns - 416 pages
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Page 80 - The only, and as it happened insurmountable, difficulty remaining, was the obstinate averseness of great part of the citizens to alter their old properties, and to recede from building their houses again on the old ground and foundations ; as also the distrust in many and unwillingness to give up their properties, though for a time only, into the hands of public trustees or commissioners, till they might be dispensed to them again, with more advantage to themselves than otherwise was possible to...
Page 77 - Exchange to stand free in the middle of a piazza and be as it were the nave or centre of the town, from whence the 60 feet streets as so many ways should proceed to all principal parts of the city ; the building to be contrived after the form of the Roman Forum with double porticoes. Many streets also to radiate upon the bridge. The streets of the first and second magnitude to be carried on as straight as possible and to centre in four or five piazzas. " The Key or open Wharf on the...
Page 391 - Where any street within any urban district (not being a highway repairable by the inhabitants at large) or the carriage-way footway or any other part of such street is not sewered levelled paved metalled flagged channelled and made good or is not lighted to the satisfaction of the urban authority...
Page 4 - The truth is that in this work we have neglected the amenities of life. We have forgotten that endless rows of brick boxes, looking out upon dreary streets and squalid backyards, are not really homes for people, and can never become such, however complete may be the drainage system, however pure the water supply, or however detailed the bylaws under which they are built.
Page 9 - I suppose few people would venture to assert, and yet most civilised people act as if it were of none, and in so doing are wronging both themselves and those that are to come after them; for that beauty, which is what is meant by art, using the word in its widest sense, is, I contend, no mere accident...
Page 77 - In order to a proper reformation, Wren, pursuant to the royal command, immediately after the fire, took an exact survey of the whole area and confines of the burning, having traced over with great trouble and hazard the great plain of ashes and ruins...
Page 79 - Leaving St. Paul's on the left, we proceed, as our first way led us, towards the Tower, the way being all along adorned with parochial churches. We return again to Ludgate, and, leaving St. Paul's on the right hand, pass the other great branch to the Royal Exchange, seated...
Page 77 - The streets to be of three magnitudes; the three principal leading straight through the city, and one or two cross streets to be at least 90 ft. wide; others 60 ft. and lanes about 30 ft., excluding all narrow, dark alleys without thoroughfares and courts.
Page 245 - ... grouping of these when erected ; it will therefore be necessary in some cases to concede something from one point of view or another, in one case sacrificing the beauty of the buildings for the greater convenience of the traffic and in another sacrificing a little of the directness of the traffic lines for the purpose of securing the more beautiful grouping of the buildings. Much of the picturesqueness of old Gothic towns springs from the narrowness of the streets. Not only does this narrowness...
Page 9 - In desiring powers for town planning our town communities are seeking to be able to express their needs, their life, and their aspirations in the outward form of their towns, seeking, as it were, freedom to become the artists of their own cities, portraying on a gigantic canvas the expression of their life.

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