The World According to Mister Rogers: Important Things to Remember

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Thorndike Press, May 1, 2004 - Philosophy - 221 pages
7 Reviews
"The World According to Mr. Rogers is a timeless collection of wisdom on love, friendship, respect, individuality, and honesty from the man who has been a friend to generations of Americans. There are a few personalities who evoke such universal feelings of warmth as Fred Rogers. An enduring presence in American homes for over 30 years, his plainspoken wisdom continues to guide and comfort many. "The World According to Mr. Rogers distills the legacy and singular worldview of this beloved American figure.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - realbigcat - LibraryThing

A nice small book and a very quick read. Fred Rogers is an American icon. Generations of children grew up listening to the wit and wisdom of this kind gentle man. This book is filled with his favorite ... Read full review

Mr.Rogers

User Review  - lorraine e. - Overstock.com

Excellent. A must for every graduate. Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Fred McFeely Rogers was born on March 20, 1928 in Pennsylvania. He was an American television personality, educator, Presbyterian minister, composer, songwriter, author, and activist. Rogers was most famous for creating, hosting, and composing the theme music for the educational preschool television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood (1968 - 2001), which featured his gentle, soft-spoken personality. Originally he was educated to be a minister but was displeased with the way television addressed children and made an effort to change this when he began to write for and perform on local Pittsburgh-area shows dedicated to youth. WQED developed his own show in 1968 and it was distributed nationwide by Eastern Educational Television Network. Over the course of three decades on television, Fred Rogers became an indelible American icon of children's entertainment and education, as well as a symbol of compassion, patience, and morality. Rogers received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, some forty honorary degrees, and a Peabody Award. He was inducted into the Television Hall of Fame, was recognized by two Congressional resolutions, and was ranked No. 35 among TV Guide's Fifty Greatest TV Stars of All Time.[5] Several buildings and artworks in Pennsylvania are dedicated to his memory, and the Smithsonian Institution displays one of his trademark sweaters as a "Treasure of American History". Rogers was diagnosed with stomach cancer in December 2002, not long after his retirement. He underwent surgery on January 6, 2003, which was unsuccessful. Rogers died on the morning of February 27, 2003, at his home with his wife by his side, less than a month before he would have turned 75.

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