Graphics: A Manual of Drawing and Writing, for the Use of Schools and Families

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J. P. Peaslee, 1835 - Copybooks - 88 pages
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Page 4 - Writing is little else than drawing the forms of letters; drawing is little more than writing the forms of objects." He published a book about travels in Italy which is very wordy but factually valuable and of some psychological interest; he also contributed some unreliable reminiscences to The Crayon. However, portraiture was his major occupation; and there were enough good ones among his large output, especially...
Page 5 - ... therefore, who are capable of diversifying their writing have learned to draw their letters after different models ; and can, with comparative facility, learn to draw the forms of other objects. " It is worthy of especial remark, that there is no person, however ignorant of drawing, who does not habitually discriminate between the proportions and contours of objects, even in the human countenance, in their most minute variations. This demonstrates the universal accuracy of the eye, and leaves...
Page 31 - ... at a time ; nor is it necessary to compel delicate little fingers to strain in the formation of very large letters in copies, the professed object of which is to teach a small current hand, when a medium size is sufficient for their definition. " It may be remarked, as advantageous in this manual, that the elegances of copperplates have not been employed, which, both in writing and drawing, frequently deter young people from attempting to imitate them. Ruder lessons, given with the pencil or...
Page 29 - ... student must be now prepared. To attempt to write before the eye has become critical of the forms, and the hand can obey the judgment, is only to labor against reason, and to fall into bad habits. The teacher of writing endeavors to guard against these by the force of habit, which, in a degree, answers the purpose ; but not with the certainty and charm which encourage such as have been prepared by the elements of drawing. It is time enough then to commence writing, which is of so much importance...
Page 31 - ... instruction in writing, which express so exactly our own views, that we shall subjoin them in an insulated manner. " As in drawing, so in writing, it is an error to commence with heavy strokes. Accuracy of form is best attained by light lines ; and all the beauties of hairstroke and swell can be afterward studied, and easily grafted upon the true forms. It is enough to conquer one difficulty at a time ; nor is it necessary to compel delicate little fingers to strain in the formation of very large...
Page 29 - It ia time enough then to commence writing, which is of so much importance that its attainment is worthy of every effort ; but no effort can be so effectual as one which follows a wellgrounded study of principles which are the foundation of that as well as so many other arts. Children are usually put to writing too young. They cannot begin to draw too soon. And they should not be permitted to learn to write until they are somewhat prepared for it, which will make it easy and desirable : indeed it...
Page 86 - Is published at a price so moderate as to place It within the reach of alL"— Scotsman.
Page 29 - ... instruction books, and disheartens many learners. Next comes the transition from drawing to writing, " The regular course of drawing is here suspended, to introduce a system of writing which is essentially founded on that of drawing, and for which the student must be now prepared. To attempt to write before the eye has become critical of the forms, and the hand can obey the judgment, is only to labor against reason, and to fall; into bad habits. The teacher of writing endeavors to guard against...
Page 50 - ... though they may be, are more within the reach of ordinary abilities. The object here is to teach correct principles and a good honest practice, a medium common.sense course, which may enable the student afterward to acquire, by self-directed efforts, more varied refinements and elaborate excellences. fancy for such refinements. It appears, therefore, to be of primary importance in seeking the power and advantages of writing, to divest it of all needless incumbrances, to articulate every letter...
Page 31 - ... remark, that they seem to be exactly such as the system demands, and such as will secure proficiency to those who faithfully use them. There are a few observations of Mr. Peale, on instruction in writing, which express so exactly our own views, that we shall subjoin them in an insulated manner. " As in drawing, so in writing, it is an error to commence with heavy strokes. Accuracy of form is best attained by light lines ; and all the beauties of hairstroke and swell can be afterward studied,...

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