The Eagle and the Peacock: U.S. Foreign Policy Toward India Since Independence

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1995 - History - 194 pages

This work is a study of American foreign policy toward India since 1947. It examines the roles that the United States has played on the South Asian stage during the 45 years that constitute the history of the Cold War. In contrast to the interest that Cold War historians have displayed toward such areas as Europe and the Far East, little has been done with regard to India. Many Indian analyses consist largely of cliches and stereotypes and adopt an intensive tone of moral judgement. With the end of the Cold War in the 1990s the need for this study is more compelling since the politics of the Cold War had so greatly shaped Indo-American relations from the beginning of modern India's independence.

 

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Contents

AngloAmerican Competition and Indian Freedom
9
Truman and the Indian Famine of 1946
23
Trumans Point Four Mutual Security and the Grain Deal of 1951
39
Indian Nonalignment and IndoAmerican Conflicts
57
Cold War Comes to South Asia
71
USPakistan Military Alliance Trade and Aid to India
93
The New Frontier Kennedy Johnson and India
113
The Nixon and Indira Gandhi Challenges
131
Carter Human Rights and IndoAmerican Relations
147
Reagan and India
159
Conclusion
173
Selected Bibliography
179
Index
189
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

M. SRINIVAS CHARY is Adjunct Professor at the New School of Social Research in New York. He is the author of United States Foreign Policy Toward India, 1947-1954 (1980) and The Hindu Temple (1994).

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