Home on the Rails: Women, the Railroad, and the Rise of Public Domesticity

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Univ of North Carolina Press, Mar 13, 2006 - Social Science - 296 pages
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Recognizing the railroad's importance as both symbol and experience in Victorian America, Amy G. Richter follows women travelers onto trains and considers the consequences of their presence there.

For a time, Richter argues, nineteenth-century Americans imagined the public realm as a chaotic and dangerous place full of potential, where various groups came together, collided, and influenced one another, for better or worse. The example of the American railroad reveals how, by the beginning of the twentieth century, this image was replaced by one of a domesticated public realm--a public space in which both women and men increasingly strove to make themselves "at home."

Through efforts that ranged from the homey touches of railroad car decor to advertising images celebrating female travelers and legal cases sanctioning gender-segregated spaces, travelers and railroad companies transformed the railroad from a place of risk and almost unlimited social mixing into one in which white men and women alleviated the stress of unpleasant social contact. Making themselves "at home" aboard the trains, white men and women domesticated the railroad for themselves and paved the way for a racially segregated and class-stratified public space that freed women from the home yet still preserved the railroad as a masculine domain.

 

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Contents

Women Travelers Respectability and Life in the Cars
32
Railway Travel and the Rise of Public Domesticity
59
The Railroad and the Regendering of Victorian Public Life
86
Conductors Porters and Courtesy as Service
112
New Women Fit for Public Life
134
Epilogue
161
Notes
165
Bibliography
221
Index
257
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About the author (2006)

Amy G. Richter is assistant professor of history at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. The dissertation on which this book is based won the 2001 Lerner-Scott Prize from the Organization of American Historians.

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