Civil and political history of New Jersey

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P. Keen & E. Chandler, 1848 - New Jersey - 500 pages
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Page 485 - Congress be authorized to make such requisitions in proportion to the whole number of white and other free citizens and inhabitants of every age, sex, and condition, including those bound to servitude for a term of years, and three-fifths of all other persons not comprehended in the foregoing description, except Indians not paying taxes...
Page 369 - That the only representatives of the people of these colonies are persons chosen therein by themselves, and that no taxes ever have been, or can be constitutionally imposed on them, but by their respective legislatures.
Page 486 - ... and all Treaties made and ratified under the authority of the United States shall be the supreme law of the respective States...
Page 484 - States, to devise such further provisions as shall appear to them necessary to render the constitution of the federal government adequate to the exigencies of the union...
Page 359 - America ; it is agreed, that for the future, the confines between the dominions of His Britannic Majesty, and those of His Most Christian Majesty, in that part of the world, shall be fixed irrevocably by a line drawn along the middle of the river Mississippi, from its source to the river Iberville, and from thence, by a line drawn along the middle of this river, and the lakes Maurepas and Pontchartrain, to the sea...
Page 485 - Resolved, that, in addition to the powers vested in the United States in Congress, by the present existing Articles of Confederation, they be authorized to pass acts for raising a revenue, by levying a duty or duties on all goods or...
Page 129 - Island, and bounded on the east part by the main sea and part by Hudson's River, and hath upon the west Delaware Bay or River, and extendeth southward to the main ocean as far as Cape May, at the mouth of Delaware Bay, and to the northward as far as the northernmost branch of the said Bay or River of Delaware, which is forty-one degrees and forty minutes of latitude...
Page 486 - Resolved that the United States in Congress be authorized to elect a federal Executive to consist of persons, to continue in office for the term of years...
Page 369 - That it is inseparably essential to the freedom of a people, and the undoubted right of Englishmen, that no taxes be imposed on them but with their own consent, given personally or by their representatives.
Page 404 - Persuaded that the salvation of the rights and liberties of America, depends, under God, on the firm union of its inhabitants, in a vigorous prosecution of the measures necessary for its safety, and convinced of the necessity of preventing the anarchy and confusion which attend a dissolution of the powers of government; we, the freemen, freeholders, and inhabitants of the city and county of...

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