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Harper Collins, Jul 25, 2006 - Fiction - 912 pages
21 Reviews

From the acclaimed author who enthralled the world with Exodus, Battle Cry, QB VII, Topaz, and other beloved classics of twentieth-century fiction comes a sweeping and powerful epic adventure that captures the "terrible beauty" of Ireland during its long and bloody struggle for freedom. It is the electrifying story of an idealistic young Catholic rebel and the valiant and beautiful Protestant girl who defied her heritage to join his cause. It is a tale of love and danger, of triumph at an unthinkable cost -- a magnificent portrait of a people divided by class, faith, and prejudice -- an unforgettable saga of the fires that devastated a majestic land . . . and the unquenchable flames that burn in the human heart.


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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - terriks - LibraryThing

This book offers up an interesting time in history in a country not given much thought aside from silly-jolly St. Patrick's Day. Some of the characters are drawn better than others, and there are ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - MaryEvelynLS - LibraryThing

Excellent historical fiction about Ireland's struggles with England and the fight to declare it's independence. Trinity is based on actual events and takes the reader on a journey throughout Ireland ... Read full review


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About the author (2006)

Internationally acclaimed novelist Leon Uris ran away from home at age seventeen, a month after the attack on Pearl Harbor, to join the Marine Corps, and he served at Guadalcanal and Tarawa. His first novel, Battle Cry, was based on his own experiences in the Marines, which he revisited in his final novel, O'Hara's Choice. His other novels include the bestsellers Redemption, Trinity, Exodus, QB VII, and Topaz, among others. Leon Uris passed away in June 2003.

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