Leadership in Science and Technology: A Reference Handbook

Front Cover
William Sims Bainbridge
SAGE, Oct 20, 2011 - Biography & Autobiography - 984 pages
2 Reviews
This 2-volume set within the SAGE Reference Series on Leadership tackles issues relevant to leadership in the realm of science and technology. To encompass the key topics in this arena, this handbook features 100 topics arranged under eight headings. Volume 1 concentrates on general principles of science and technology leadership and includes sections on social-scientific perspectives on S&T leadership; key scientific concepts about leading and innovating in S&T; characteristics of S&T leaders and their environments; and strategies, tactics, and tools of S&T leadership. Volume 2 provides case studies of leadership in S&T, with sections considering leadership in informal communities of scientists and engineers; leadership in government projects and research initiatives; leadership in industry research, development, and innovation; and finally, leadership in education and university-based research. By focusing on key topics within 100 brief chapters, this unprecedented reference resource offers students more detailed information and depth of discussion than typically found in an encyclopedia entry but not as much jargon, detail or density as in a journal article or a research handbook chapter. Entries are written in language and style that is broadly accessible, and each is followed by cross-references and a brief bibliography and further readings. A detailed index and an online version of the work enhances accessibility for today’s student audience.
 

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Excellent resource and chapter authors.

Contents

1 Anthropology
3
2 Cognitive Science
13
3 Economics
23
4 Futures Studies
32
5 Linguistics
41
Theory Tools and Practice
49
7 Political Science
60
8 Social Psychology
69
52 Artificial Intelligence
464
53 The Chicago School of Sociology
472
54 The Climate Change Debate
480
55 Fuzzy Logic
488
56 The Harvard Department of Social Relations
496
57 Human Dimensions of Biology
504
58 Natural Disasters
512
59 The Psychoanalytic Movement
520

9 Sociology
77
10 Urban and Regional Planning
86
Key Concepts
95
11 Controversies
97
12 Creative Destruction
105
13 Design Science
114
14 Diffusion of Innovations
123
15 Group Processes
132
16 Human Subjects Research
140
17 Mechanizing Ethics
149
18 National Preeminence
157
19 Research Groups
165
20 Research Misconduct
175
21 The Scientific Method
183
22 Social Complexity
191
23 Sustainability
201
24 Technology Convergence
210
Contexts
221
25 Fallibility and Authority
223
26 Inclusive Technologies
231
27 Intellectual Property Rights
240
28 Moral Exemplars
249
29 Multicultural Teams
255
30 New Media
264
31 Political Economy
272
32 Product Liability
281
33 Productivity of Invention
289
34 Public Attitudes Toward Science and Technology
298
35 Religion and Science
307
36 Science Careers
316
37 Social Movements
325
38 Virtual Organizations
334
Tactics and Tools
343
39 Computer Simulation
345
40 Creative Cognition
355
41 Followership
363
42 Gatekeeping
371
43 Management Tools for Innovation
380
44 Peer Review
389
45 The Precautionary Principle
397
46 Program Evaluation
406
47 Science of Science Policy
416
48 Strategic Thinking
426
49 The Triple Helix
434
50 Workshops and Networks
443
Discovery and Debate
453
51 Advice to the US Government
455
60 Quantum Mechanics
529
61 Science Fiction
537
62 Service Science
546
63 The SETI Institute
556
64 Sociobiology
564
65 Spectral Music
573
66 Transhumanism
582
Collaboratories
591
67 Blacksburg Electronic Village
593
68 Computer Tomography Virtual Organization
602
69 DataIntensive Astronomy
611
70 Human Relations Area Files
619
71 Information Technology Research
628
72 The Mars Exploration Rover Mission
636
73 The Perseus Project
644
74 Polar Research
653
75 The Protein Data Bank
661
76 Social Science Data Archives
668
77 University Corporation for Atmospheric Research
676
Technology Development
685
78 Apollo Project
687
79 Avatars
695
80 The Digital Library Initiative
703
81 Energy Program Evaluation
712
82 Environmentally Compatible Textiles
721
83 From ARPAnet Through NSFnet to Internet
729
84 Geographic Information Systems
738
85 Harpsichord Makers
746
86 The Manhattan Project
754
87 National Nanotechnology Initiative
762
88 Open Source Software Development
772
89 Robotics in Japan
782
90 Television
788
91 The V2 Rocket Program
796
92 Vaccination
804
Education
813
93 American Association for the Advancement of Science Education Programs
815
94 Educational Games and Virtual Reality
824
95 Engineering Education
833
96 International Comparative Studies in Education
842
97 National Science Digital Library
851
98 The New Math
861
99 The Open University UK
869
100 Undergraduate Biology Education
878
Index
887
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About the author (2011)

William Sims Bainbridge earned his doctorate in sociology from Harvard University, with a dissertation on the social origins of the space program, which became his first of 18 published scientific books (not counting edited volumes). He taught sociology, including the sociology of science and technology as well as theory and research methods, in major universities for 20 years. During this academic career, he wrote and published educational software, including computer-supported textbooks on survey research methods and techniques of statistical data analysis. In 1992, he came to the National Science Foundation to direct the Sociology Program. At NSF, Bainbridge represented the social and behavioral sciences on many of the major technology-related government initiatives, including High Performance Computing and Communications, the Digital Library Initiative, Information Technology Research, and the National Nanotechnology Initiative. Given his computer background, in 2000 Bainbridge moved to the NSF Directorate for Computer & Information Science & Engineering, serving three years as deputy director of the Division of Information & Intelligent Systems, and as a grants officer in programs such as Human-Computer Interaction, Science & Engineering Informatics, Artificial Intelligence, and currently Human-Centered Computing. During this time, he gained editorial experience as a member of the editorial team creating an Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics, writing 75 articles for a variety of conventional encyclopedias, editing three special issues of journals, then being sole editor of the Berkshire Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction. This HCI encyclopedia was comparable to the current project in that it brought together 100 articles in two volumes to cover an important emerging area between the social and physical sciences and engineering. His efforts in the National Nanotechnology Initiative led him to be co-organizer and co-editor of several major book-length reports, published in conventional paper form and electronically. In approaching this leadership handbook, Bainbridge can draw upon over 16 years managing grant-giving programs across several sciences and areas of technology at NSF, during which time he developed an appreciation of many fields outside his own expertise and gained enduring contacts with a large number of leaders in science and engineering.

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