Chambers's Encyclopaedia: A Dictionary of Universal Knowledge for the People, Volume 2

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J.B. Lippincott & Company, 1883
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Page 95 - ... shall have transferred to and vested in him all rights of suit, and be subject to the same liabilities in respect of such goods as if the contract contained in the bill of lading had been made with himself.
Page 79 - And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked, and they sewed fig leaves together and made themselves aprons.
Page 89 - Provided that nothing in this section contained shall extend to any second marriage contracted elsewhere than in England and Ireland by any other than a subject of Her Majesty, or to any person marrying a second time whose husband or wife shall have been continually absent from such person for the space of seven years then last past, and shall not have been known by such person to be living within that time...
Page 118 - IT is evident unto all men, diligently reading Holy Scripture, and ancient authors, that from the Apostles' time there have been these Orders of Ministers in Christ's Church; Bishops, Priests, and Deacons.
Page 21 - They kindle a fire, and dress a repast of eggs and milk in the consistence of a custard. They knead a cake of oatmeal, which is toasted at the embers against a stone.
Page 95 - Nothing herein contained shall prejudice or affect any right of stoppage in transitu, or any right to claim freight against the original shipper or owner, or any liability of the consignee or indorsee by reason or in consequence of his being such consignee or indorsee, or of his receipt of the goods by reason or in consequence of such consignment or indorsement.
Page 32 - That levying money for or to the use of the crown, by pretence of prerogative, without grant of parliament, for longer time, or in other manner, than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal.
Page 355 - ... government, command and disposition of the militia and of all forces by sea and land and of all forts and places of strength is and by the laws of England ever was the undoubted right of his Majesty and his royal predecessors, kings and queens of England, and that both or either of the Houses of Parliament cannot nor ought to pretend to the same...
Page 317 - For every man's land is, in the eye of the law, enclosed and set apart from his neighbor's; and that either by a visible and material fence, as one field is divided from another by a hedge, or by an ideal, invisible boundary, existing only in the contemplation of law, as when one man's land adjoins to another's in the same field.
Page 117 - Let them show the beginnings of their churches, let them recite their bishops one by one, each in such sort succeeding other that the first bishop of them have had for his author and predecessor some apostle, or at least some apostolical person who persevered with the Apostles; for so apostolical churches are wont to bring forth the evidence of their estates.

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