Memoir, Letters, and Remains, Volume 2

Front Cover
Ticknor and Fields, 1862
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 179 - And seeing that the National Assembly is prevented by violence from exercising its powers, it decrees as follows, viz. : Louis Napoleon Bonaparte is deprived of all authority as President of the Republic. The citizens are enjoined to withhold their obedience. The executive power has passed in full right to the National Assembly. The judges of the High Court of Justice are enjoined to meet immediately, under pain of forfeiture, to proceed to the judgment of the President and his accomplices; consequently,...
Page 217 - How is it that the word gentleman, which in our language denotes a mere superiority of blood, with you is now used to express a certain social position, and amount of education, independent of birth ; so that in two countries the same word, though the sound remains the same, has entirely changed its meaning ? When did this revolution take place ? How, and through what transitions...
Page 183 - The number now present was 218, to whom were added about 20 more in the course of the evening, consisting of members who had voluntarily caused themselves to be arrested. Almost all the men known to France and to Europe who formed the majority of the Legislative Assembly, were gathered together in this place. Few were wanting, except those who, like M. Mole, had not been suffered to reach their colleagues. There were present, among others, the...
Page 177 - Algerine dominion ; who, moreover, were stimulated by a donation of five francs distributed to every soldier who was in Paris that day. The Representatives nevertheless presented themselves to go in ; having at their head one of their Vice-Presidents, M. Daru. This gentleman was violently struck by the soldiers, and the representatives who accompanied him were driven back at the point of the bayonet. Three of them, M. de Talhouet, Etienne, and Duparc, were slightly wounded. Several [S] others had...
Page 409 - The talent, labour, and skill which she wasted in her salon, would have gained and governed an empire. She was virtuous, if it be virtuous to persuade every one of a dozen men that you wish to favour him, though some circumstance always occurs to prevent your doing so. Every friend thought himself preferred. She governed us by little distinctions, by letting one man come five minutes before the others, or stay five minutes after. Just as Louis XIV. raised one courtier to the seventh heaven by giving...
Page 183 - All, all!" exclaimed the members of the Assembly. After much hesitation the commissaires de police decided to act. They caused each of the two Presidents to be seized by the collar.
Page 178 - M. iJenoist d'Azy. M. Daru was arrested in his own house ; the fourth vice-president, the illustrious General Bedeau, had been seized that morning in his bed and handcuffed like a robber. As for the president, M. Dupin, he was absent, which surprised no one, as his cowardice was known.
Page 158 - it will not. A despotic monarchy, or a despotic aristocracy, may retain its power for centuries against the will of its subjects ; but an unpopular democracy sounds like a contradiction in terms, and must soon become a contradiction in fact. " As soon as the people has found the means of ascertaining and expressing its will, it will select, or accept, or submit to the master whom it prefers to self-government. "Those who imposed on us this constitution knew that it would be unpopular. They tried...
Page 43 - ... at length, that for some days as it approached finishing, I could scarce keep from fainting. The exercise which most nearly has approached to pleasure, has been the finding parallel passages to passages in St. Athanasius, or writing verses, processes which have not much of active intellect in them. I might say a great deal more on this subject; but I have said enough as giving the testimony of at least one person. What I feel, others may feel. Others again may feel neither your pleasure nor my...
Page 217 - Tocqueville, in 1853) that the word gentleman, which in our language denotes a mere superiority of blood, with you is now used to express a certain social position and amount of education, independent of birth ; so that in two countries the same word, though the sound remains the same, has entirely changed its meaning? When did this revolution take place? How, and through what transitions ? If I had the honour of a personal acquaintance with Mr.

Bibliographic information