A History of the Theory of Elasticity and of the Strength of Materials: From Galilei to the Present Time, Volume 2, Issue 1

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University Press, 1893 - Elasticity
 

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Volume 2, Part 1

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Page 688 - Strength and other Properties of Metals: Reports of Experiments on the Strength and other Properties of Metals for Cannon. With a Description of the Machines for testing Metals, and of the Classification of Cannon in service. By Officers of the Ordnance Department US Army. By authority of the Secretary of War. Illustrated by 25 large steel plates. In one volume, 4to. . $10.00 SULLIVAN.— Protection to Native Industry. By Sir EDWARD SULLIVAN, Baronet, author of " Ten Chapters on Social Reforms.
Page vi - I cannot doubt but that these things, which now seem to us so mysterious, will be no mysteries at all; that the scales will fall from our eyes; that we shall learn to look on things in a different way — when that which is now a difficulty will be the only common-sense and intelligible way of looking at the subject.
Page 625 - Woodcuts. 3 vols. crown 8vo. 10s. 6d. each. The Application of Cast and Wrought Iron to Building Purposes. By the same Author. Third Edition, with 6 Plates and 118 Woodcuts. 8vo. 16s. Iron Ship Building, its History and Progress, as comprised in a Series of...
Page 301 - That the medium which transmits light and radiant heat consists of the nuclei of the atoms, vibrating independently, or almost independently, of their atmospheres...
Page 564 - Iron is rendered magnetical if scoured or filed, bent or twisted, when in the position of the magnetic axis, or near this position ; the upper end becoming a south pole, and the lower end a north pole...
Page 595 - ... occurred in vertical planes, splitting up the specimen in all directions; cracks were noticed to form some time before the specimen finally gave way; then these rapidly increased in number, splitting the glass into innumerable irregular prisms of the same height as the cube; finally, these bent or broke, and the pressure, no longer bedded on a firm surface, destroyed the specimen.
Page 126 - ... 849, which from their historical and physical aspects are perhaps the most interesting portions of the work. [188.] Appendix I. (pp. 512 — 19) contains certain elementary proofs due to Poncelet as to the curvature, deflection etc. of the elastic line. A point on p. 518 on the question of built-in terminals (encastrements) may be noted. Poncelet remarks that for a cantilever we may suppose two forces, whose resultant is equal and opposite to that of the load, to act at the built-in end. These...
Page 758 - The explanation of this remarkable phenomenon, now that the fact is known, is not difficult. The stone tends to give way by bulging out in the centre of each of its four perpendicular faces, and to form two pyramidal figures with their apices opposed to each other at the...
Page 744 - ... soft or hard, and the consequent influence this reduction must have on the amount of weight sustained by the specimen before breaking. The apparent mystery of a very inferior description of iron suspending, under a steady load, fully a third more than a. very superior kind, vanishes at once when we find that the former had the benefit of retaining to the last its original area only slightly decreased ; whilst the latter on breaking was reduced to very nearly a fourth of its original area —...

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