Nothing Is Too Wonderful to Be True

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, May 8, 1997 - Science - 446 pages
0 Reviews
Here is a provocative collection of essays by Philip Morrison, widely known for his work on the Manhattan project, and later for his involvement in quantum and nuclear physics and high energy astrophysics. Morrison offers a stimulating look at diverse subjects ranging from cosmology (particularly interstellar communication) to nuclear disarmament to creative ways of teaching science. He also offers his own perspective on his inspiring friendships with Niels Bohr, Richard Feynman, Bernard Peters, and other physics giants.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

SOMETHING PERSONAL
2
THEORIES LARGE AND SMALL
9
The Wonder of Time
18
Why Man Explores
37
Science and the Nation
47
The Simulation of Intelligence
64
The Actuary of Our Species
70
Cause Chance and Creation
88
Ice that Sinks
244
The Full and Open Classroom
259
Symbol or Substance?
270
Knowing Where You
282
WAR AND PEACE IN THE AGE OF URANIUM
289
Physics of the Bomb
300
Accidents with Atomic Weapons
317
The Spiral of Peril
328

On Broken Symmetries
99
Looking at the World
115
ASTRONOMY SHINES
133
The Explosive Core
143
Is M82 Really Exploding?
153
A Whisper from Space
162
SEARCHING FOR INTERSTELLAR COMMUNICATIONS
173
Twenty Years After
179
A Talk with Philip Morrison
196
The Search for Extraterrestrial Communications
204
ON LEARNING AND TEACHING
215
Insecurity Through Technical Prowess
341
Nationalism Science and Individual Responsibility
370
FRIENDS AND HEROES
381
A Glimpse of the Other Side
393
An Old Friend
399
Bernard Peters and
406
Far Ahead of His Time
415
Sources and Acknowledgments
436
About the Author
445
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (1997)

Philip Morrison is emeritus professor of physics at MIT.

Bibliographic information