Charles S. Peirce's Evolutionary Philosophy

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Cambridge University Press, May 28, 1997 - Philosophy - 230 pages
In this systematic introduction to the philosophy of Charles S. Peirce, the author focuses on four of Peirce's fundamental conceptions.
 

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Contents

THE ORIGINS OF PRAGMATICISM
20
Belief and the Logic of Inquiry
21
The Pragmatic Maxim
37
Pragmaticism as a Realism or an Objective Idealism
51
PRAGMATICISM AND SEMEIOTIC
57
The AntiCartesian Basis of Pragmaticism and Semeiotic
60
Signs and Their Conditions
67
Incipient Signs and Semeiotic Processes
74
Peirce as Idealist
147
Passages Supportive of Peirces Realism
150
Antiidealism
153
The Realism at the Foundation of Pragmaticism
168
The Attack on Necessitarianism
169
Agape
173
Spontaneity and Continuity
177
Conclusion
190

Representation
75
Interpretants and Objects
79
Classes of Signs
84
THE CATEGORIES AND THE PHENOMENOLOGY
94
The Origin of the Categories in On a New List of Categories
96
From the Categories of the New List to the Phenomenology
107
The Origin and Scope of Peirces Phenomenology
108
The Phenomenological Description
113
The Aim Method and Scope of Phenomenology
116
The Categories Phenomenologically Described
120
SYNECHISM AND PEIRCES EVOLUTION REALISM
140
Epistemological Realist and Metaphysical Idealist or Epistemological Idealist and Metaphysical Realist?
143
EVOLUTIONARY REALISM AND THE LINGUISTIC TURN
194
An Overview of the Issue
197
Rortys Contingency View of Language
201
Davidsons View
206
Putnams Realism
209
The Peircean Picture
214
The Ideal Limit and Convergence
215
Local Extralinguistic Constraints
221
Conclusion
224
Index
227
Copyright

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Page 9 - ... or representamen, is something which stands to somebody for something in some respect or capacity. It addresses somebody, that is, creates in the mind of that person an equivalent sign, or perhaps a more developed sign. That sign which it creates I call the interpretant of the first sign. The sign stands for something, its object. It stands for that object, not in all respects, but in reference to a sort of idea, which I have sometimes called the ground of the representamen.

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