The Cambridge History of Islam: Volume 2B, Islamic Society and Civilisation

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P. M. Holt, Peter Malcolm Holt, Ann K. S. Lambton, Bernard Lewis
Cambridge University Press, Apr 21, 1977 - History - 580 pages
The aim of these volumes is to present the history of Islam as a cultural whole. It is hoped that in a single concise work the reader will be able to follow all the main threads: political, theological, philosophical, economic, scientific, military, artistic. But The Cambridge history of Islam is not a repository of facts, names and dates; it is not intended primarily for reference, but as a book for continuous reading. The editors believe that, while it will not be despised by the expert orientalist, it will be useful to students in other fields of history, and particularly to university students of oriental subjects, and will also appeal to those who read history for intellectual pleasure. -- From Preface Volume 1A (page ix).
 

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Contents

List of Plates
vii
Acknowledgements
x
Preface
xi
Introduction
xiii
ISLAMIC SOCIETY AND CIVILIZATION
441
THE GEOGRAPHICAL SETTING
443
THE SOURCES OF ISLAMIC CIVILIZATION
469
ECONOMY SOCIETY INSTITUTIONS
511
b PERSIAN LITERATURE
671
c TURKISH LITERATURE
682
d URDU LITERATURE
695
ART AND ARCHITECTURE
700
SCIENCE
739
PHILOSOPHY
778
WARFARE
822
THE TRANSMISSION OF LEARNING AND LITERARY INFLUENCES TO WESTERN EUROPE
849

LAW AND JUSTICE
539
RELIGION AND CULTURE
569
MYSTICISM
604
REVIVAL AND REFORM IN ISLAM
632
LITERATURE
657
Dynastic List
888
Bibliography
889
Glossary
905
Index
909
Copyright

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About the author (1977)

Bernard Lewis was born in London, England on May 31, 1916. He graduated with honors in history from the School of Oriental Studies at the University of London in 1936 with special reference to the Middle East. In 1938, he was named an assistant lecturer at the University of London, where he received a Ph.D. the next year. In 1940, he was drafted into the British armed forces and assigned to the Army tank corps. He was soon transferred to intelligence. He taught at the University of London for 25 years. In 1974, he accepted joint appointments at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey and Princeton University. He also taught at Cornell from 1984 to 1990. He became an American citizen in 1982. He was a scholar of Middle Eastern history and a prolific writer. His books included The Emergence of Modern Turkey, What Went Wrong?: The Clash between Islam and Modernity in the Middle East, and From Babel to Dragomans: Interpreting the Middle East. Because he was considered an expert on interactions between the Christian and Islamic worlds, his view helped shape American foreign policy under President George W. Bush. He died on May 19, 2018 at the age of 101.

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