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Books Books 1 - 10 of 180 on True wit is nature to advantage dressed, — What oft was thought, but ne'er so well....
" True wit is nature to advantage dressed, — What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed; Something whose truth convinced at sight we find, That gives us back the image of our mind. "
THE AMERICAN QUARTERLY REVIEW - Page 541
by The American Quarterly Review March& June,1835 VOL.XVII - 1835
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An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie, L.L.D...

Sir William Forbes - 1806 - 559 pages
...thought in different language will disgust or delight us. So just is the axiom of Pope,— " True wit.1 is nature to advantage dressed ; " What oft. was thought, but ne'er so well expressed." " I believe I mentioned in a former letter, that I had seen Bryant on the " Rowleyan...
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An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie: Including ..., Volume 2

Sir William Forbes - 1807
...are aware of. The same thought in different language will disgust or delight us. So just is the axiom of Pope, — " True wit,* is nature to advantage dressed ; " What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed." " I believe I mentioned in a former letter, that I had seen Bryant on the ' Rowleyan...
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An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie, LL.D., Late ..., Volume 2

Sir William Forbes, James Beattie - 1807
...are aware of. The same thought in different language will disgust or delight us. So just is the axiom of Pope, — " True wit,* is nature to advantage dressed ; " What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed." " I believe I mentioned in a former letter, that I had seen Bryant on the ' Rowleyan...
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An Account of the Life and Writings of James Beattie: Including Many of His ...

Sir William Forbes - College teachers - 1807 - 559 pages
...thought in different language will disgust or delight us. So just is the axiom of Pope, — 9 *Tnie wit,* is nature to advantage dressed ; " What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed." " I believe I mentioned in a former letter, that I had seen Bryant on the " Rowleyan...
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Poetry for Schools: Designed for Reading and Recitation. The Whole Selected ...

Eliza Robbins - English poetry - 1828 - 383 pages
...pride." " Trust not thyself — thy own defects to know Make use of every friend, and every foe." " True wit is nature to advantage dressed — What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed." " 'Tis not a lip, or eye, we beauty call, But the joint force and full result of all."...
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The London university magazine

1829
...source in the vulgar opinion, with respect to style and the very nature of language. The poet says, " True wit is nature to advantage dressed, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed." The critic cavils at this, and says, it is to degrade wit thus to define it, making...
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The Cambridge Book of Poetry and Song

Charlotte Fiske Bates - American poetry - 1832 - 882 pages
...verbal critic lays, For not to know some trifles is a praise. [From An Essay on Criticism.] WIT. TKUE wit is nature to advantage dressed ; What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed : Something, whose truth, convinced at sight we find, That gives us back the image of...
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The American Quarterly Review, Volume 17

1835
...whole human family, and which serve to make us all feel closely akin— one whose originality of stylo is constantly reminding us of that fine saying of...power and felicity all his own. Such a writer was Scott — and such a writer is Bird. Of course we do not speak with a precise reference to what he...
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Memoirs of the life of ... sir James Mackintosh [extr. from ..., Volume 2

James Mackintosh (sir.) - 1835
...the modern sense of ludicrous fancy, I cannot tell. It must have been after Pope's definition — ' True wit is nature to advantage dressed, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed.' By the way, was there ever a stronger instance than this of the second verse of a...
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Memoirs of the Life of Sir James Mackintosh, Volume 2

Sir James Mackintosh - 1836
...to the modern sense of ludicrous fancy, I cannot tell. It must have been after Pope's definition — True wit is nature to advantage dressed, What oft was thought, but ne'er so well expressed. " llth. — Read a curious old life of Sir T. More, just published from a MS. at Lambeth,...
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