Letters and Notes on the Manners, Customs, and Condition of the North American Indians ...

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Page 217 - The last winner always has the rolling of the ring, and both start and throw the tchung-kee together ; if either fails to receive the ring or to lie in a certain position, it is a forfeiture of the amount of the number he was nearest to, and he loses his throw ; when another steps into his place. This game is a very...
Page 336 - our nation is poor, and it is necessary that you should all go to the country where you can get meat, — my eyes are dimmed and my strength is no more ; my days are nearly all numbered, and I am a burthen to my children — I cannot go, and I wish to die. Keep your hearts stout, and think not of me ; I am no longer good for anything.
Page 769 - religious, would convey but a faint idea of the deep hue " of piety and devotion which pervades the whole of their " conduct. Their honesty is immaculate ; and their purity "of purpose, and their observance of the rites of their " religion, are most uniform and remarkable. They are, "certainly, more like a nation of saints than a horde of
Page 756 - He said he had been told that when all the white people were born, their white medicine-man had to stand by and look on — that in the Indian country the women would not allow that — they would be ashamed — that he had been along the Frontier, and a good deal amongst the white people, and he had seen them whip their little children — a thing that is very cruel — he had heard also, from several white...
Page 497 - I have ever seen; but the moment they mount their horses, they seem at once metamorphosed, and surprise the spectator with the ease and elegance of their movements. A...
Page 200 - ... to them, they oftentimes have in store great quantities of dried squashes and dried "pommes blanches," a kind of turnip which grows in great abundance in these regions, and of which I have before spoken.
Page 31 - America, as a nation of human beings, are on theij wane ; that (to use their own very beautiful figure) " they are fast travelling to the shades of their fathers, towards the setting sun;" and that the traveller who would see these people in their native simplicity and beauty, must needs be hastily on his way to the prairies and Rocky Mountains, or he will see them only as they are now seen on the frontiers, as a basket of dead game, — harassed, chased, bleeding and dead ; with their plumage and...
Page 283 - And on the next day while 1 was painting his portrait, he told me there were four tortoises, — one in the North — one in the East — one in the South, and one in the West ; that each one of these rained ten days, and the water covered over the earth.
Page 399 - ... and scrapers for graining the robes — and others are broken up for the marrow-fat which is contained in them. Their sinews are used for strings and backs to their bows — for thread to string their beads and sew their dresses. The feet of the animals are boiled, with their hoofs, for the glue they contain, for fastening their arrow points, and many other uses. The hair from the head and shoulders, which is long, is twisted and braided into halters, and the tail is used for a fly brush.
Page 267 - Each one was then instantly raised with the cords until the weight of his body was suspended by them, and then, while the blood was streaming down their limbs, the bystanders hung upon the splints each man's appropriate shield, bow and quiver...

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